frontality

Related to frontality: ostiate, articulite

frontality

(frənˈtælɪtɪ)
n
(Art Terms) fine arts a frontal view, as in a painting or other work of art
References in periodicals archive ?
13) The authors examine the characteristics of Cubist paintings--such as frontality, suppression of depth, and contraction of space--and demonstrate their application to architecture in terms of phenomenal transparency.
This piece possesses elements of Egyptian frontality and diverse geometric forms.
British painters hung on spatial illusion, whereas flatness and frontality came naturally to the Americans.
Multiple screens create engulfing surroundings that overturn cinematic frontality, as in Stan VanDerBeek's Movie Mural, 1968, Alex Da Corte and Jayson Musson's Easternsports, 2014, and Dora Budor's Adaptation of an Instrument, 2016.
With the simple frontality and the large window openings of their main facade on the public space, the dwellings project a strong presence.
In addition, the fact that the drawings lack direct frontality by encircling the entire chamber forces the viewer to physically engage with the vessel by turning it to see the entire image.
Our gaze replaces Ellington's as the camera cuts back to Jeffries for the line "For it's you I rely on, and a love that is true"; the dramatic visual frontality of this image, coupled with Jeffries's suave crooning and handsome, urbane visage, gives a special charge to this part of the arrangement, amplifying the aura of sophistication and exotic-romantic fantasy.
Both Candide and Alice retain a more traditionally theatrical sense of space as a stage or set, the tableau effect of situating characters against depictions of perspectival landscapes in the two productions accentuated by the radical frontality and immobility of the camera, and in Candide the continuous presence of narrator Finlay and use of props such as the mechanical devices also contribute to the sense of the production's theatrical staging.
Although she regarded herself as a figurative painter, the consistent frontality and spatial ambiguity of Biala's works challenge this characterization" (8).
Therefore, Ceravolo has the ability to adhere to formalism concepts in his exploration of spatial frontality.
The frontality where the image placed us suddenly rends, but the rend in its turn becomes frontality; a frontality that holds us in suspense, motionless, we who, for an instant, no longer know what to see under the gaze of this image.
Holoka (1985, 229) observes that "She is like a figure in a painting not only because she is central and mute, but also because she does not break the gaze" On the significance of frontality, see Frontisi-Ducroux 1996, 80-9.