Frozenness


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Fro´zen`ness


n.1.A state of being frozen.
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Second, it has recorded multiple plan records when one plan is frozen and another is introduced, adding an indication of frozenness to the record of the frozen plan.
The table shows that frozenness has a statistically significant effect on defined benefit plan participation.
This melancholy seems to be part of both personal and cultural aging, as the speaker, living in wintry Scotland, looks to England only to find another sort of frozenness.
Dead, deaf telegraph-wires moaned around the valley, stretched far away in frozenness as though into distant desert-steppes, and no longer reached the great mother city.
Sacher Masoch's suspense gestures toward awaited pleasures that never quite arrive (or are described so vaguely that the effect is of frozenness and fetishism).
semantic non-transparency ensuing from non-compositional meaning assignment) and frozenness (i.
But once rights can be transferred, markets are likely to enter the picture, and whatever attributes might be assigned to markets, frozenness is not one of them.
This line of descent connects his own poetry and the writings of Sebald to the melancholy characteristic of Modernist pessimism as experienced, in different ways, by Auden and Owen, in which frozenness usually connotes impotence and inability to act.
As Armstrong argues, the entrancement of Merlin is symbolic of the photographic process itself, where the subject is fixed in a frame where s/he will stand, bewitched and static, for ever--what Armstrong calls "the trancelike stillness of the gaze and the mute frozenness of the photograph" (p.
The tense difference between the French copula in (42b) and its counterpart in the English gloss has to do with the high degree of frozenness of the French c'est cleft:
Schulze leaves it open whether these East Germans' inner desert, emotional frozenness, and social paralysis are a legacy from their communist past or a reaction to the silent threat of imposed westernization.
In general, it needs to be noted that primary verb phrases, though certainly idiomatic to some degree, are far more free and compositional than the prototypical phraseological idioms, which is proved by their greater syntactic freedom, greater compositionality and lesser internal frozenness.