frug


Also found in: Wikipedia.

frug

(fruːɡ)
n
a type of dance popular in the 1960s
vb (intr)
to dance in such a style
References in periodicals archive ?
A particular favorite, he says, is "Rich Man's Frug," with its interweaving clusters crossing and circling one another.
Dance Dance Dance City Library Heard of The Frug, The Ooble or The Popcorn?
In the 1990s, Professor Frug postulated that "[o]nly a central government seems capable of bringing together the disparate groups that have grown so remote from each other.
22) See Baxi 2010, 2014; Frug 2014; Menon, 1998; MacKinnon, 2001 for further discussion.
For more than a century, it's been understood that city power derives from state law," says Harvard Law School professor Gerald Frug, co-author of City Bound: How States Stifle Urban Innovation.
and Outback power, chief marketing officer Jordan Frug said.
Many of the women become so stimulated that they rise up and begin to perform the Frug.
In a forthcoming work, I focus on Duncan Kennedy, Roberto Unger, Gerald Frug, and David Kennedy as representative of the various styles of legal structuralism being developed at Harvard Law School in the 1970s and early 1980s.
SIXTY, THOUGH, MEANS THAT THAT PARTICULAR FRUG IS JUST about up.
Frug argues that the public choice model propounded by Tieboutian localists fails to recognize that the true ability to choose one's municipality of residence is a luxury enjoyed by few.
Hecht declares that Sissman's well-crafted poems will endure and outlast all the perishable contemporary fads: "bra-less, liberated, cool co-eds," Mod fashions, spontaneous Happenings, Little Leagues, Edsel cars, Frug dances, the dim wit of Raquel Welch and (quoting Sissman in the last line) the deluded "connoisseurs of California wines.