fruitwood

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fruit·wood

 (fro͞ot′wo͝od′)
n.
The wood of any of several fruit-bearing trees, such as the apple, cherry, or pear, used especially in cabinetmaking.

fruitwood

(ˈfruːtˌwʊd)
n
(Furniture) the wood of a fruit tree, esp when used in furniture making

fruit•wood

(ˈfrutˌwʊd)

n.
any of various woods from fruit-bearing trees, used for cabinetmaking and the like.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fruitwood - wood of various fruit trees (as apple or cherry or pear) used especially in cabinetwork
applewood - wood of any of various apple trees of the genus Malus
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
wood - the hard fibrous lignified substance under the bark of trees
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The stills are fired using the finest Sicilian fruitwoods from Blood Orange and Lemon trees.
Inexpensive rifles often have stocks made of beech or birch, and in America custom stocks are still often made of maple, or fruitwoods such as cherry and apple.
Traditional bedroom furniture range crafted from solid fruitwoods with tile and stone inlay detail.
According to the Encyclopedia of Wood, "Cherry is probably the most popular of the fruitwoods, because it is possible to derive Larger sizes of timber from it than from the orchard woods of pear, apple or plum.
Available in multiple wood choices including: cherry, poplar, walnut, sycamore, curly maple, red and white oak burled oak, fruitwoods and others.
Natural woods are a must for this look, the list of possibilities is endless but as a guide choose from rich toned fruitwoods, distinctive oaks and grainy walnuts.
But when did you last visit the Studiolo that Duke Federico da Montefeltro commissioned for his palace at Gubbio and marvel at the intarsia of walnut, beech, rosewood, oak and fruitwoods depicting cupboards of musical instruments and books, workmanship that even takes into account the shadows that sunlight streaming through the window would throw?
Highlanders originally used fruitwoods to make their pipes, until colonisation discovered the easier to shape blackwood.
Mesquite and hickory are the most popular wood flavors, but fruitwoods and nutwoods like pecan are attracting attention from adventuresome outdoor chefs.