fugitive


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fu·gi·tive

 (fyo͞o′jĭ-tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Running away or fleeing, as from the law.
b. Of or relating to fugitives: "My brother ... was on the fugitive squad, tracking draft dodgers" (James Carroll).
2.
a. Lasting only a short time; fleeting: "[His] house and burial place ... should be visited by all who profess even a fugitive interest in political economy" (John Kenneth Galbraith).
b. Difficult to comprehend or retain; elusive: fugitive solutions to the problem.
c. Given to change or disappearance; perishable: fugitive beauty; fugitive tint.
d. Of temporary interest: "Apart from juvenilia and fugitive verses, his poetic legacy consists of only some seventy poems" (Daniel Hoffman).
3. Wandering or tending to wander; vagabond: "We also chanced upon fugitive monks, penniless pilgrims and tradesmen" (Jeanne Marie Laskas).
n.
1. A person who flees, especially from a legal process, persecution, or danger.
2. Something fleeting or ephemeral.

[Middle English fugitif, from Old French, from Latin fugitīvus, from fugitus, past participle of fugere, to flee.]

fu′gi·tive·ly adv.
fu′gi·tive·ness n.

fugitive

(ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv)
n
1. a person who flees
2. a thing that is elusive or fleeting
adj
3. fleeing, esp from arrest or pursuit
4. not permanent; fleeting; transient
5. moving or roving about
[C14: from Latin fugitīvus fleeing away, from fugere to take flight, run away]
ˈfugitively adv
ˈfugitiveness n

fu•gi•tive

(ˈfyu dʒɪ tɪv)

n.
1. a person who is fleeing from prosecution or intolerable circumstances.
adj.
2. having taken flight, or run away: a fugitive convict.
3. fleeting; transitory.
4. dealing with subjects of passing interest, as writings; ephemeral: fugitive essays.
5. wandering, roving, or vagabond.
[1350–1400; Middle English fugitif < Old French < Latin fugitīvus fleeing]
fu′gi•tive•ly, adv.
fu′gi•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fugitive - someone who flees from an uncongenial situation; "fugitives from the sweatshops"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.fugitive - someone who is sought by law officers; someone trying to elude justice
absconder - a fugitive who runs away and hides to avoid arrest or prosecution
criminal, crook, felon, malefactor, outlaw - someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime
escapee - someone who escapes
Adj.1.fugitive - lasting for a markedly brief timefugitive - lasting for a markedly brief time; "a fleeting glance"; "fugitive hours"; "rapid momentaneous association of things that meet and pass"; "a momentary glimpse"
short - primarily temporal sense; indicating or being or seeming to be limited in duration; "a short life"; "a short flight"; "a short holiday"; "a short story"; "only a few short months"

fugitive

noun
1. runaway, refugee, deserter, escapee, runagate (archaic) He was a fugitive from justice.
adjective
1. momentary, short, passing, brief, fleeing, temporary, fleeting, unstable, short-lived, transient, flitting, ephemeral, transitory, evanescent, fugacious, flying Love is as fugitive and insubstantial as smoke, yet we all pursue it.

fugitive

adjective
1. Fleeing or having fled, as from home, confinement, captivity, or justice:
noun
One who flees, as from home, confinement, captivity, or justice:
Translations
هارِب
uprchlík
flygtningflygtig
karkulainenpakolainen
menekülő
flóttamaîur
fugitivus
bėglys
bēglis
vluchtelingvluchtelingevoortvluchtigvoortvluchtige
diffuserømling
begunacbegunicabegunka

fugitive

[ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv]
A. ADJ
1.fugitivo
2. (liter) (= fleeting) → efímero, pasajero
B. Nfugitivo/a m/f; (= refugee) → refugiado/a m/f
fugitive from justiceprófugo/a m/f (de la justicia)

fugitive

[ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv] nfugitif/ive m/f
a fugitive from justice → un fugitif recherché(e) par la justice

fugitive

n (= runaway)Flüchtling m (→ from vor +dat); he is a fugitive from justiceer ist auf der Flucht vor der Justiz
adj
(= escaping)flüchtig; fugitive vehicleFluchtfahrzeug nt
(liter, = fleeting) thought, happiness, hour, visitflüchtig

fugitive

[ˈfjuːdʒɪtɪv]
1. nfuggitivo/a, profugo/a; (from prison) → evaso/a
2. adjfuggitivo/a (liter) (fleeting) → fugace, fuggevole

fugitive

(ˈfjuːdʒətiv) noun
a person who is running away (from the police etc). a fugitive from justice.
References in classic literature ?
Then recollecting the importance of securing the fugitive, he dashed aside the surrounding bushes, and pressed eagerly forward to lend his aid in the chase.
The lamp alarms and frightens Jonah; as lying in his berth his tormented eyes roll round the place, and this thus far successful fugitive finds no refuge for his restless glance.
This lucky salvation was cheaply purchased by the loss of Queequeg's hat, who, while standing in the bows to prick the fugitive whales, had his hat taken clean from his head by the air-eddy made by the sudden tossing of a pair of broad flukes close by.
And suiting the action to the word, the door flew open, and the light of the tallow candle, which Tom had hastily lighted, fell on the haggard face and dark, wild eyes of the fugitive.
It is there that the fugitive slave, and the Mexican prisoner on parole, and the Indian come to plead the wrongs of his race should find them; on that separate but more free and honorable ground, where the State places those who are not with her, but against her--the only house in a slave State in which a free man can abide with honor.
It was seven weeks after the first fall of the Empire, and poor Marie Louise, ex-Empress was a fugitive.
As soon as he had taken his seat, filled with hope and admiration, I rose, and declared that PATRICK HENRY, of revolutionary fame, never made a speech more eloquent in the cause of liberty, than the one we had just listened to from the lips of that hunted fugitive.
For, the fugitive out on the marshes with the ironed leg, the mysterious young man, the file, the food, and the dreadful pledge I was under to commit a larceny on those sheltering premises, rose before me in the avenging coals.
Also, because of Nada, Dingaan and Umslopogaas were now at bitter enmity, and for this same cause I was disgraced and a fugitive, and my counsels would no longer be heard in the ear of the king.
Back to thy punishment, False fugitive, and to thy speed add wings, Least with a whip of Scorpions I pursue Thy lingring, or with one stroke of this Dart Strange horror seise thee, and pangs unfelt before.
Oswald deemed it his duty to secure Gurth, as a fugitive of whose fate his master was to judge.
Just at the door the captain aimed at the fugitive one last tremendous cut, which would certainly have split him to the chine had it not been intercepted by our big signboard of Admiral Benbow.