fulsome


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ful·some

 (fo͝ol′səm)
adj.
1. Excessively flattering or insincerely earnest. See Synonyms at unctuous.
2. Disgusting or offensive: "With the stink of decaying corpses so near her cave ... suddenly she felt overpowered by the fulsome reek" (Jean Auel).
3. Usage Problem Copious or abundant.

[Middle English fulsom, abundant, well-fed, arousing disgust : ful, full; see full1 + -som, adj. suff.; see -some1.]

ful′some·ly adv.
ful′some·ness n.
Usage Note: The original meaning of fulsome was "copious, abundant." But fulsome is now most often used of remarks that involve excessive praise or ingratiating flattery, as in Their fulsome compliments were viewed as an awkward attempt at winning approval. This narrower application of the word has become its sole meaning for many educated speakers, to the point where a large majority of the Usage Panel disapproves of the use of fulsome to mean simply "full" or "copious." In our 2012 survey, only 19 percent accepted the use of fulsome as a synonym of full in the sentence You can adjust the TV's audio settings for a more fulsome bass in movie soundtracks. Use of the word as a synonym of copious or expansive found only slightly more takers—21 percent accepted The final report will furnish a more detailed and fulsome discussion of the issues involved. The use of fulsome as a simple synonym of praising without a clear indication of inordinacy or insincerity split the Panel nearly down the middle, with 55 percent accepting the example The research director claimed that the product was a major advance that would improve Web access for everyone, and the marketing VP was equally fulsome in her remarks. Thus it may be best to avoid fulsome except where the context unambiguously conveys the idea that the praise in question is excessive or fawning.

fulsome

(ˈfʊlsəm)
adj
1. excessive or insincere, esp in an offensive or distasteful way: fulsome compliments.
2. not standard extremely complimentary
3. informal full, rich or abundant: a fulsome figure; a fulsome flavour; fulsome detail.
4. archaic disgusting; loathsome
ˈfulsomely adv
ˈfulsomeness n
Usage: The use of fulsome to mean extremely complimentary or full, rich or abundant is common in journalism, but should be avoided in other kinds of writing

ful•some

(ˈfʊl səm, ˈfʌl-)

adj.
1. offensive to good taste, esp. as being excessive; overdone: fulsome décor.
2. disgusting; sickening; repulsive: fulsome mounds of greasy foods.
3. excessively or insincerely lavish: fulsome admiration.
4. encompassing all aspects; comprehensive.
5. abundant or copious.
[1200–50; Middle English fulsom; see full1, -some1]
ful′some•ly, adv.
ful′some•ness, n.
usage: The original meaning of fulsome was “abundant or copious,” but for centuries the word was used almost exclusively in its later senses “offensive,” “disgusting,” and “excessively lavish.” Today, fulsome and its adverb fulsomely are also used in senses closer to the original one: Compare the stark sentences of the final speech with the fulsome language of the first draft.Later they discussed the topic more fulsomely. Because some insist that fulsome must always retain the connotation of “excessive” or “offensive,” the common expression fulsome praise may be ambiguous in modern use.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fulsome - unpleasantly and excessively suave or ingratiating in manner or speech; "buttery praise"; "gave him a fulsome introduction"; "an oily sycophantic press agent"; "oleaginous hypocrisy"; "smarmy self-importance"; "the unctuous Uriah Heep"; "soapy compliments"
insincere - lacking sincerity; "a charming but thoroughly insincere woman"; "their praise was extravagant and insincere"

fulsome

fulsome

adjective
Affectedly and self-servingly earnest:
Translations

fulsome

[ˈfʊlsəm] ADJ (pej) [praise] → excesivo, exagerado; [manner] → obsequioso

fulsome

[ˈfʊlsəm] adj (pejorative)
[praise] → excessif/ive
[manner] → exagéré(e)

fulsome

adj praise, tribute, compliment, manner, tone (= effusive)überschwänglich; (= exaggerated)übertrieben; apology, supportuneingeschränkt; his most fulsome praisesein höchstes Lob; he paid fulsome tribute to her courageer würdigte ihren Mut uneingeschränkt; she was fulsome in her praise of the childrensie lobte die Kinder überschwänglich

fulsome

[ˈfʊlsəm] adj (pej) (praise) → esagerato/a, eccessivo/a; (manner) → insincero/a
References in classic literature ?
and further instancing the known truth that in the case of animals, the young, which may be called the green fruit of the creature, is the better, all con- fessing that when a goat is ripe, his fur doth heat and sore engame his flesh, the which defect, taken in con- nection with his several rancid habits, and fulsome appetites, and godless attitudes of mind, and bilious quality of morals --"
And by hideous con- trast, a redundant orator was making a speech to another gathering not thirty steps away, in fulsome laudation of "our glorious British liberties
But was it possible, when Flora used to smile at him on the Braid ponds, she could have looked so fulsome to a sick- hearted bystander?
It is not my intention to be fulsome, but I confess that I covet your skull.
The subjects are various--the conventionalized love of the poet for a certain Rosalind; current religious controversies in allegory; moral questions; the state of poetry in England; and the praises of Queen Elizabeth, whose almost incredible vanity exacted the most fulsome flattery from every writer who hoped to win a name at her court.
Grimsby, a friend of his, but a man I very greatly disliked: there was a sinister cast in his countenance, and a mixture of lurking ferocity and fulsome insincerity in his demeanour, that I could not away with.
They are fulsome obtrusive dogs; they gild palm-leaves.
Her servility and fulsome compliments when Emmy was in prosperity were not more to that lady's liking.
DEAR Editor, It comes as no surprise to me that Sir Albert Bore has received fulsome praise from Tony Blair, our ex-PM, who led us into an illegal war.
The fulsome beards have been groomed by the award-winning Mr Robinsons barbershop and decorated with flowers by Garden Gate flowers, before each of the 15 volunteers was photographed by Jamie Gray.
In my meeting with … Wang Yi, he indicated I think a different readiness of China to try to resolve some of this, though I think it was still not as fulsome as many of us would like to see," Kerry later told reporters.
It was great reading the fulsome content of the upbeat article 'A year of revival' by Avinash Saxena.