fumbling


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Related to fumbling: stammering

fum·ble

 (fŭm′bəl)
v. fum·bled, fum·bling, fum·bles
v.intr.
1. To touch or handle nervously or idly: fumble with a necktie.
2. To grope awkwardly to find or to accomplish something: fumble for a key.
3. To proceed awkwardly and uncertainly; blunder: fumble through a speech.
4.
a. Football To drop a ball that is in play.
b. Baseball To mishandle a ground ball.
v.tr.
1. To touch or handle clumsily or idly: "fumbled the skeleton key into the lock and turned it" (Bentley Dadmun).
2. To make a mess of; bungle. See Synonyms at botch.
3. To feel or make (one's way) awkwardly.
4.
a. Football To drop (a ball) while in play.
b. Baseball To mishandle (a ground ball).
n.
1. The act or an instance of fumbling.
2. Sports A ball that has been fumbled.

[Middle English fomelen, to grope.]

fum′bler n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fumbling - showing lack of skill or aptitude; "a bungling workman"; "did a clumsy job"; "his fumbling attempt to put up a shelf"
unskilled - not having or showing or requiring special skill or proficiency; "unskilled in the art of rhetoric"; "an enthusiastic but unskillful mountain climber"; "unskilled labor"; "workers in unskilled occupations are finding fewer and fewer job opportunities"; "unskilled workmanship"
Translations

fumbling

adj, fumblingly
advungeschickt
References in classic literature ?
They was setting around, some of them talking a little, in a low voice, and all of them fidgety and uneasy, but trying to look like they warn't; but I knowed they was, because they was always taking off their hats, and putting them on, and scratching their heads, and changing their seats, and fumbling with their buttons.
I' faith, yes," said Master Jacques, fumbling in his pouch; "this parchment.
Trent stepped out as Monty's nervous fingers were fumbling with the cork.
I have no doubt that it was largely nervousness that kept the mysterious playwright so long fumbling behind the scenes, for it was obvious that it would be no ordinary sort of play, no every-day domestic drama, that would satisfy this young lady, to whom life had given, by way of prologue, the inestimable blessing of wealth, and the privilege, as a matter of course, of choosing as she would among the grooms (that is, the bride-grooms) of the romantic British aristocracy.
And suddenly that father whom she had judged would look for his spectacles in her presence, fumbling near them and not seeing them, or would forget something that had just occurred, or take a false step with his failing legs and turn to see if anyone had noticed his feebleness, or, worst of all, at dinner when there were no visitors to excite him would suddenly fall asleep, letting his napkin drop and his shaking head sink over his plate.
The calf, fumbling, poked her nose under her mother's udder, and stiffened her tail out straight.
Duchess had had four helps already, and was fumbling with the spoon.