functionalist


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

func·tion·al·ism

 (fŭngk′shə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The doctrine that the function of an object should determine its design and materials.
2. A doctrine stressing purpose, practicality, and utility.
3. Philosophy The doctrine in the philosophy of mind according to which mental states are defined by their causes and effects.

func′tion·al·ist′ adj. & n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.functionalist - an adherent of functionalism
admirer, booster, protagonist, supporter, champion, friend - a person who backs a politician or a team etc.; "all their supporters came out for the game"; "they are friends of the library"
Translations

functionalist

[ˈfʌŋkʃnəlɪst] (frm)
A. ADJfuncionalista
B. Nfuncionalista mf

functionalist

[ˈfʌŋkʃənəlɪst] adj [approach, model] → fonctionnaliste
References in periodicals archive ?
dissenting) dissented separately to uphold the balanced-budget act on New Deal functionalist grounds.
Based on Burrell and Morgan (1979), each educational philosophy can be related to one of the four broad world views or paradigms: functionalist, interpretive, radical humanist, and radical structuralist.
More interested in highlighting the relative strengths and weaknesses of various "perspectives" than in writing a purely diachronic history of theories, Bell traces the genealogy of three broad methodological approaches: (1) those seeking the origins and/or essence of ritual; (2) functionalists and structuralists; and (3) culturalists, including symbolists, linguists, "performance" theorists, and most recently, the "practice" theorists who have most deeply influenced Bell's own approach.
This section is intended to discuss paradigms, their underlying assumptions, and show how any worldview can be positioned on a continuum formed by four basic paradigms: functionalist, interpretive, radical humanist, and radical structuralist.
Although the innateness hypothesis is highly appreciated, it cannot be regarded successful in every sense; just like the functionalist approach, it does not succeed in solving the puzzle of fit.
The functionalist school of interpreting the Holocaust is represented by a Polish sociologist, Zygmunt Bauman, and two contemporary German historians, Jeffrey Herf and Goetz Aly.
Huang Ziping outlines a sensible functionalist approach to Chinese literary studies in his intelligent response to Liu Zaifu's famous argument for a more homegrown and original Chinese literary criticism - and less imitation of whichever Western critics happen to be in vogue at the moment.
In this way, Winkelman is simply building on the foundations of the structural functionalist anthropologists who have come before him.
His position is an interesting one; he reconciles an interest in variability in material culture as 'culture history' with his functionalist interest in material culture as adaptation.
To understand "corporate culture" ideology, one must first understand its functionalist and behaviorist foundations.
Rejecting personalist, structuralist, functionalist, and even normative orientations, the authors opt for a primarily phenomenological methodology.
Indeed, the crisis in which the university finds itself exists to the extent to which the newer functionalist position with respect to the university has displaced the traditional practical idea of the academy.

Full browser ?