fundamental


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to fundamental: Fundamental analysis, Fundamental theorem of calculus, Fundamental research, Fundamental rights, Fundamental units

fun·da·men·tal

 (fŭn′də-mĕn′tl)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the foundation or base; elementary: the fundamental laws of the universe.
b. Forming or serving as an essential component of a system or structure; central: an example that was fundamental to the argument.
c. Of great significance or entailing major change: a book that underwent fundamental revision.
2. Of or relating to the lowest possible frequency or the lowest frequency component of a vibrating element, system, periodic wave, or quantity: a fundamental chord.
3. Music Having the root in the bass: a fundamental chord.
n.
1. Something that is an essential or necessary part of a system or object.
2. The lowest frequency of a periodically varying quantity or of a vibrating system.

fun′da·men′tal·ly adv.

fundamental

(ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəl)
adj
1. of, involving, or comprising a foundation; basic
2. of, involving, or comprising a source; primary
3. (Music, other) music denoting or relating to the principal or lowest note of a harmonic series
4. (General Physics) of or concerned with the component of lowest frequency in a complex vibration
n
5. a principle, law, etc, that serves as the basis of an idea or system: teaching small children the fundamentals of road safety.
6. (Music, other)
a. the principal or lowest note of a harmonic series
b. the bass note of a chord in root position
7. (General Physics) physics
a. the component of lowest frequency in a complex vibration
b. the frequency of this component
ˌfundamenˈtality, ˌfundaˈmentalness n

fun•da•men•tal

(ˌfʌn dəˈmɛn tl)

adj.
1. serving as, or being an essential part of, a foundation or basis; basic; underlying: fundamental principles.
2. of, pertaining to, or affecting the foundation or basis: a fundamental revision.
3. being an original or primary source: a fundamental idea.
n.
4. a basic principle, rule, law, or the like that serves as the groundwork of a system; essential part.
5.
a. the root of a chord in music.
b. the lowest component in a series of harmonics.
6. Physics. the component of lowest frequency in a composite wave.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Medieval Latin fundāmentālis]
fun`da•men′tal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fundamental - any factor that could be considered important to the understanding of a particular business; "fundamentals include a company's growth, revenues, earnings, management, and capital structure"
factor - anything that contributes causally to a result; "a number of factors determined the outcome"
2.fundamental - the lowest tone of a harmonic series
harmonic - a tone that is a component of a complex sound
Adj.1.fundamental - serving as an essential component; "a cardinal rule"; "the central cause of the problem"; "an example that was fundamental to the argument"; "computers are fundamental to modern industrial structure"
important, of import - of great significance or value; "important people"; "the important questions of the day"
2.fundamental - being or involving basic facts or principles; "the fundamental laws of the universe"; "a fundamental incomatibility between them"; "these rudimentary truths"; "underlying principles"
basic - pertaining to or constituting a base or basis; "a basic fact"; "the basic ingredients"; "basic changes in public opinion occur because of changes in priorities"
3.fundamental - far-reaching and thoroughgoing in effect especially on the nature of something; "the fundamental revolution in human values that has occurred"; "the book underwent fundamental changes"; "committed the fundamental error of confusing spending with extravagance"; "profound social changes"
significant, important - important in effect or meaning; "a significant change in tax laws"; "a significant change in the Constitution"; "a significant contribution"; "significant details"; "statistically significant"

fundamental

adjective
2. basic, essential, underlying, organic, profound, elementary, rudimentary The two leaders have very fundamental differences.

fundamental

adjective
1. Arising from or going to the root or source:
2. Of or being an irreducible element:
3. Constituting or forming part of the essence of something:
noun
1. A fundamental irreducible constituent of a whole:
basic, element, essential, rudiment (often used in plural).
2. A fundamental principle or underlying concept:
base, basis, cornerstone, foundation, fundament, root, rudiment (often used in plural).
3. A broad and basic rule or truth:
Translations
أساسأصْلي ، جَوْهَري ،أوَّلي، أساسي
podstatnýzákladzákladní
fundamentfundamentalgrundlag
põhi-
fundamentalanosnovaosnovantemeljtemeljni
alapelem
grundvallar-, undirstöîu-undirstaîa, grundvallaratriîi
pagrindinis dalykas
būtiskspamati
temeljen

fundamental

[ˌfʌndəˈmentl]
A. ADJ
1. (= basic) [question, problem, principle] → fundamental
they are being denied their fundamental human rightsse les está privando de los derechos humanos fundamentales
2. (= profound, great) [change, difference] → fundamental
it is a fundamental mistake to think thates un error fundamental pensar que ...
3. (= essential) → fundamental, esencial
to be fundamental to sthser fundamental or esencial para algo
it is fundamental to our understanding of the problemes fundamental or esencial para que entendamos el problema
4. (= intrinsic) [honesty, good sense] → intrínseco
B. NPL the fundamentalslos fundamentos, lo básico

fundamental

[ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəl] adj (= underlying) [principle, difference] → fondamental(e), essentiel(e)
to be fundamental to sth → être essentiel(le) à qch
(= far-reaching) [change, error] → fondamental(e)

fundamental

adj
(= essential) issue, question, conceptgrundlegend; reasoneigentlich; pointzentral; feature, partwesentlich; fundamental principle/right/beliefsGrundprinzip nt/-recht nt/-überzeugungen pl; fundamental mathematical conceptsGrundbegriffe plder Mathematik; of fundamental importancevon grundlegender Bedeutung; carbon is fundamental to lifeKohlenstoff ist für alles Leben grundlegend; fundamental to impressionism was the use of bright coloursdie Verwendung von leuchtenden Farben war grundlegend für den Impressionismus
(= basic) problem, difference, contradictiongrundsätzlich; (= basic and deep) change, revolution, shiftgrundlegend, umwälzend; (= elementary) mistake, error, flawgrundlegend, fundamental; I don’t doubt his fundamental goodnessich zweifle nicht daran, dass er im Grunde ein guter Mensch ist; his fundamental ignorance of this subjectseine fundamentale Unkenntnis auf diesem Gebiet; fundamental structure/formGrundstruktur f/-form f; fundamental researchGrundlagenforschung f
(Mus) → Grund-; fundamental note/frequencyGrundton m/-frequenz f
pl fundamentals (of subject)Grundbegriffe pl; (of a problem)Grundlagen pl; the fundamentals of physicsdie Grundbegriffe plder Physik; to get down to (the) fundamentalsbis zu den Grundlagen vordringen

fundamental

[ˌfʌndəˈmɛntl] adjfondamentale
his fundamental honesty → la sua innata onestà

fundamental

(fandəˈmentl) adjective
of great importance; essential; basic. Respect for law and order is fundamental to a peaceful society.
noun
a basic or essential part of any thing. Learning to read is one of the fundamentals of education.
ˌfundaˈmentally adverb
He was fundamentally honest.
References in classic literature ?
Though looked upon as a weighty man among his contemporaries in respect of animal substance, and as favored with a remarkable degree of fundamental development, well adapting him for the judicial bench, we conceive that the modern Judge Pyncheon, if weighed in the same balance with his ancestor, would have required at least an old-fashioned fifty-six to keep the scale in equilibrio.
This fundamental thing settled, the next point is, in what internal respect does the whale differ from other fish.
I have always thought, that one of the most curious and valuable objects of antiquaries has been to trace the progress of society, by the efforts made in early ages to improve the rudeness of their first expedients, until they either approach excellence, or, as is more frequently the case, are supplied by new and fundamental discoveries, which supersede both the earlier and ruder system, and the improvements which have been ingrafted upon it.
During the course of these troubles, the emperors of Blefusca did frequently expostulate by their ambassadors, accusing us of making a schism in religion, by offending against a fundamental doctrine of our great prophet Lustrog, in the fifty-fourth chapter of the Blundecral (which is their Alcoran).
By the fundamental principle of Christianity, the happiness of the individual is interwoven, by innumerable and imperceptible ties, with that of his contemporaries.
Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding.
Perpetuity is implied, if not expressed, in the fundamental law of all national governments.
And this is a result to be desired, not only in order to the invention of an infinity of arts, by which we might be enabled to enjoy without any trouble the fruits of the earth, and all its comforts, but also and especially for the preservation of health, which is without doubt, of all the blessings of this life, the first and fundamental one; for the mind is so intimately dependent upon the condition and relation of the organs of the body, that if any means can ever be found to render men wiser and more ingenious than hitherto, I believe that it is in medicine they must be sought for.
This renders a full display of the principal defects of the Confederation necessary, in order to show that the evils we experience do not proceed from minute or partial imperfections, but from fundamental errors in the structure of the building, which cannot be amended otherwise than by an alteration in the first principles and main pillars of the fabric.
Another would prefer a larger number, and considers it as a fundamental condition that the appointment should be made by the President himself.
Throughout the previous pages I have been assuming -- what perhaps should have been laid down at the beginning as a distinct and fundamental proposition -- that every human being in Flatland is a Regular Figure, that is to say of regular construction.
And the worst of it was, and the root of it all, that it was all in accord with the normal fundamental laws of over-acute consciousness, and with the inertia that was the direct result of those laws, and that consequently one was not only unable to change but could do absolutely nothing.

Full browser ?