fundamentalism


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Related to fundamentalism: communalism

fun·da·men·tal·ism

 (fŭn′də-mĕn′tl-ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A usually religious movement or point of view characterized by a return to fundamental principles, by rigid adherence to those principles, and often by intolerance of other views and opposition to secularism.
2.
a. often Fundamentalism An organized, militant Evangelical movement originating in the United States in the late 1800s and early 1900s in opposition to Protestant Liberalism and secularism, insisting on the inerrancy of Scripture.
b. Adherence to the theology of this movement.

fun′da·men′tal·ist adj. & n.
fun′da·men′tal·ist′ic adj.

fundamentalism

(ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity (esp among certain Protestant sects) the belief that every word of the Bible is divinely inspired and therefore true
2. (Islam) Islam a movement favouring strict observance of the teachings of the Koran and Islamic law
3. strict adherence to the fundamental principles of any set of beliefs
ˌfundaˈmentalist n, adj
ˌfundaˌmentalˈistic adj

fun•da•men•tal•ism

(ˌfʌn dəˈmɛn tlˌɪz əm)

n.
1. (sometimes cap.) a movement in American Protestantism that arose in the early part of the 20th century in reaction to Modernism and that stresses the infallibility of the Bible not only in matters of faith and morals but also as a literal historical record.
2. the beliefs held by those in this movement.
3. strict adherence to any set of basic ideas or principles.
[1920–25, Amer.]
fun`da•men′tal•ist, n., adj.

fundamentalism

1. a conservative movement in 20th-century American Protestantism in reaction to modernism, asserting especially the inerrancy of the Scriptures as a historical record and as a guide to faith and morals, and emphasizing, as matters of true faith, belief in the virgin birth, the sacrifice and death of Christ upon the cross, physical resurrection, and the Second Coming.
2. an adherence to the doctrines and practices of this movement. — fundamentalist, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
the rationale of conservative American Protestants who regard the Bible as free of errors or contradictions and emphasize its literal interpretation, usually without reference to modern scholarship. Also called literalism. — fundamentalist, n., adj.
See also: Bible
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fundamentalism - the interpretation of every word in the sacred texts as literal truth
Protestantism - the theological system of any of the churches of western Christendom that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation
Translations
fundamentalismus
fundamentalizam
fundamentalismus
fundamentalisme
fundamentalism

fundamentalism

[ˌfʌndəˈmentəlɪzəm] Nfundamentalismo m

fundamentalism

[ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəlɪzəm] n (religious)intégrisme m

fundamentalism

fundamentalism

[ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəˌlɪzm] nfondamentalismo
References in periodicals archive ?
The main purpose of which is to mobilize citizens against fundamentalism and terrorism in the region.
Due to religious fundamentalism in our country, minorities are attacked on various grounds.
Veteran actress Shabana Azmi on Monday clarified her stance in backing the 'Not in My Name' protests, stating that she will continue standing up against all fundamentalism.
This manual provides insights on religious fundamentalism drawn from experiences of women's rights activists in diverse regions in the world.
1) was the way it connected the dots among religious freedom, pluralism and fundamentalism.
Khartoum, 28 April (SUNA)-The Reporter of the Higher Committee of the International Conference on terrorism and sectarian fundamentalism, Al Fatih Mukhtar Mohamed, said he main issue the conference is dealing with remains to put in place mechanism that would remedy the basic factors behind fundamentalism and terrorism in Africa.
Synopsis: Christian Fundamentalism is a doctrine and a discourse in tension.
This study's aims were two-fold: to contribute to an understanding of the relationship between religious fundamentalism and psychological well-being and to test the psychometric properties of the Italian adaptation of the revised Religious Fundamentalism Scale (RFS-12; Altemeyer & Hunsberger, 2004), one of the most important instruments for assessing religious fundamentalism when it is conceptualized as a cognitive process.
The book's implication is that Islam is more popular than parallel movements in Catholic Latin America or Hindu India not because Hindu or Christian movements are any less extreme, but because fundamentalism in Islam functions better as a sociopolitical framework for believers.
It's not just Islam that's struggling with fundamentalism.
RELIGIOUS FUNDAMENTALISM AND FEAR: PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION USING BEHAVIORAL AVOIDANCE TESTS.