fundamental

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fun·da·men·tal

 (fŭn′də-mĕn′tl)
adj.
1.
a. Of or relating to the foundation or base; elementary: the fundamental laws of the universe.
b. Forming or serving as an essential component of a system or structure; central: an example that was fundamental to the argument.
c. Of great significance or entailing major change: a book that underwent fundamental revision.
2. Of or relating to the lowest possible frequency or the lowest frequency component of a vibrating element, system, periodic wave, or quantity: a fundamental chord.
3. Music Having the root in the bass: a fundamental chord.
n.
1. Something that is an essential or necessary part of a system or object.
2. The lowest frequency of a periodically varying quantity or of a vibrating system.

fun′da·men′tal·ly adv.

fundamental

(ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəl)
adj
1. of, involving, or comprising a foundation; basic
2. of, involving, or comprising a source; primary
3. (Music, other) music denoting or relating to the principal or lowest note of a harmonic series
4. (General Physics) of or concerned with the component of lowest frequency in a complex vibration
n
5. a principle, law, etc, that serves as the basis of an idea or system: teaching small children the fundamentals of road safety.
6. (Music, other)
a. the principal or lowest note of a harmonic series
b. the bass note of a chord in root position
7. (General Physics) physics
a. the component of lowest frequency in a complex vibration
b. the frequency of this component
ˌfundamenˈtality, ˌfundaˈmentalness n

fun•da•men•tal

(ˌfʌn dəˈmɛn tl)

adj.
1. serving as, or being an essential part of, a foundation or basis; basic; underlying: fundamental principles.
2. of, pertaining to, or affecting the foundation or basis: a fundamental revision.
3. being an original or primary source: a fundamental idea.
n.
4. a basic principle, rule, law, or the like that serves as the groundwork of a system; essential part.
5.
a. the root of a chord in music.
b. the lowest component in a series of harmonics.
6. Physics. the component of lowest frequency in a composite wave.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Medieval Latin fundāmentālis]
fun`da•men′tal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fundamental - any factor that could be considered important to the understanding of a particular business; "fundamentals include a company's growth, revenues, earnings, management, and capital structure"
factor - anything that contributes causally to a result; "a number of factors determined the outcome"
2.fundamental - the lowest tone of a harmonic series
harmonic - a tone that is a component of a complex sound
Adj.1.fundamental - serving as an essential component; "a cardinal rule"; "the central cause of the problem"; "an example that was fundamental to the argument"; "computers are fundamental to modern industrial structure"
important, of import - of great significance or value; "important people"; "the important questions of the day"
2.fundamental - being or involving basic facts or principles; "the fundamental laws of the universe"; "a fundamental incomatibility between them"; "these rudimentary truths"; "underlying principles"
basic - pertaining to or constituting a base or basis; "a basic fact"; "the basic ingredients"; "basic changes in public opinion occur because of changes in priorities"
3.fundamental - far-reaching and thoroughgoing in effect especially on the nature of something; "the fundamental revolution in human values that has occurred"; "the book underwent fundamental changes"; "committed the fundamental error of confusing spending with extravagance"; "profound social changes"
significant, important - important in effect or meaning; "a significant change in tax laws"; "a significant change in the Constitution"; "a significant contribution"; "significant details"; "statistically significant"

fundamental

adjective
2. basic, essential, underlying, organic, profound, elementary, rudimentary The two leaders have very fundamental differences.

fundamental

adjective
1. Arising from or going to the root or source:
2. Of or being an irreducible element:
3. Constituting or forming part of the essence of something:
noun
1. A fundamental irreducible constituent of a whole:
basic, element, essential, rudiment (often used in plural).
2. A fundamental principle or underlying concept:
base, basis, cornerstone, foundation, fundament, root, rudiment (often used in plural).
3. A broad and basic rule or truth:
Translations
أساسأصْلي ، جَوْهَري ،أوَّلي، أساسي
podstatnýzákladzákladní
fundamentfundamentalgrundlag
põhi-
fundamentalanosnovaosnovantemeljtemeljni
alapelem
grundvallar-, undirstöîu-undirstaîa, grundvallaratriîi
pagrindinis dalykas
būtiskspamati
temeljen

fundamental

[ˌfʌndəˈmentl]
A. ADJ
1. (= basic) [question, problem, principle] → fundamental
they are being denied their fundamental human rightsse les está privando de los derechos humanos fundamentales
2. (= profound, great) [change, difference] → fundamental
it is a fundamental mistake to think thates un error fundamental pensar que ...
3. (= essential) → fundamental, esencial
to be fundamental to sthser fundamental or esencial para algo
it is fundamental to our understanding of the problemes fundamental or esencial para que entendamos el problema
4. (= intrinsic) [honesty, good sense] → intrínseco
B. NPL the fundamentalslos fundamentos, lo básico

fundamental

[ˌfʌndəˈmɛntəl] adj (= underlying) [principle, difference] → fondamental(e), essentiel(e)
to be fundamental to sth → être essentiel(le) à qch
(= far-reaching) [change, error] → fondamental(e)

fundamental

adj
(= essential) issue, question, conceptgrundlegend; reasoneigentlich; pointzentral; feature, partwesentlich; fundamental principle/right/beliefsGrundprinzip nt/-recht nt/-überzeugungen pl; fundamental mathematical conceptsGrundbegriffe plder Mathematik; of fundamental importancevon grundlegender Bedeutung; carbon is fundamental to lifeKohlenstoff ist für alles Leben grundlegend; fundamental to impressionism was the use of bright coloursdie Verwendung von leuchtenden Farben war grundlegend für den Impressionismus
(= basic) problem, difference, contradictiongrundsätzlich; (= basic and deep) change, revolution, shiftgrundlegend, umwälzend; (= elementary) mistake, error, flawgrundlegend, fundamental; I don’t doubt his fundamental goodnessich zweifle nicht daran, dass er im Grunde ein guter Mensch ist; his fundamental ignorance of this subjectseine fundamentale Unkenntnis auf diesem Gebiet; fundamental structure/formGrundstruktur f/-form f; fundamental researchGrundlagenforschung f
(Mus) → Grund-; fundamental note/frequencyGrundton m/-frequenz f
pl fundamentals (of subject)Grundbegriffe pl; (of a problem)Grundlagen pl; the fundamentals of physicsdie Grundbegriffe plder Physik; to get down to (the) fundamentalsbis zu den Grundlagen vordringen

fundamental

[ˌfʌndəˈmɛntl] adjfondamentale
his fundamental honesty → la sua innata onestà

fundamental

(fandəˈmentl) adjective
of great importance; essential; basic. Respect for law and order is fundamental to a peaceful society.
noun
a basic or essential part of any thing. Learning to read is one of the fundamentals of education.
ˌfundaˈmentally adverb
He was fundamentally honest.
References in periodicals archive ?
very idea of fundamentality would then lose meaning.
cannot establish the greater fundamentality of the procedural provisions
Horwitz, The Supreme Court, 1992 Term: The Constitution of Change: Legal Fundamentality Without Fundamentalism, 107 HARV.
Horwitz, The Supreme Court, 1992 Term -- Foreword: The Constitution of Change: Legal Fundamentality Without Fundamentalism, 107 Harv.
According to most African-centered theories (Azibo, 1990a, 2014; Azibo, Robinson-Kyles, & Johnson, 2013) the racial nature of the construct implies that any effect of these variables would never diminish the fundamentality and psychic preeminence of the African personality construct for an ADP.
Ethical values inherit the properties of value as such, including the fundamentality of the alternative of life or death and the fact that things have value only in relation to the life of the organism as an ultimate value.
dissenting) (criticizing the majority for reviving a "fundamental rights" or "natural rights" approach to the Privileges and Immunities Clause, and insisting that the Clause prohibits unjustified discrimination against out-of-staters without regard to the fundamentality of the underlying right).
This article aims to fill this gap in metametaphysical theory by providing a credible justification of the fundamentality of metaphysics: first, by establishing a set of five conditions of fundamentality for the discipline; second, by showing that these conditions are satisfied when the object of study of metaphysics is identified with an ontologically neutral object; and the task of the discipline is taken to be the determination of the number and identity of the most general categories and the relation of less general categories to the most general ones.
Horwitz, The Supreme Court, 1992 Term--Foreword: The Constitution of Change: Legal Fundamentality Without Fundamentalism, 107 Harv.
124, 156-57 (2007), the most recent Supreme Court case addressing "partial birth abortions," the Supreme Court reinforced the fundamentality of the right to choose, but also recognized that certain abortion methods carry greater risks.
There is always already a matrix of relationships, beginning with that between creation (in each aspect and writ large) and the Creator, that emphasizes the fundamentality of our alterity and inherent relationality.
But one has to ask what is meant by the claim of fundamentality.