fundholding

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fundholding

(ˈfʌndˌhəʊldɪŋ)
n
(Economics) (formerly, in the National Health Service in Britain) the system enabling general practitioners to receive a fixed budget from which to pay for primary care, drugs, and nonurgent hospital treatment for patients
ˈfundˌholder n
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References in periodicals archive ?
The new purchasers, District Health Authorities (DHAs) and GP Fundholders, would assess health need and contract with providers (e.
An industry scheme, the Pension Protection Fund, will step in to safeguard BHS pension fundholders.
It will present options for future operating models and fleet to the Leadership Board of the North East Combined Authority during the summer, and this will inform discussions with the government and other fundholders.
at is an insult to fundholders in that it implies that we have neither the intelligence nor the alertness to spot when some get-rich-quick scheme is not all that it seems to be.
Principal fundholders at the NHS (known as Primary Care Trusts) use a commissioning system, allocating funds to practitioners via a capitation system.
Sovereign fundholders might find it attractive to invest in a share of, say, the NEC, and the council would certainly welcome the cash that might generate.
General practitioners could also voluntarily become GP fundholders, alongside health authority purchasers, having responsibility (in a limited way) for devolved budgets for purchasing elective care and prescribing.
Towards an understanding of health care purchasing: The purchasing behaviour of general practice fundholders.
Upon their election success of 1997, one of the government's first attempts at NHS change was in the area of primary care with the formation of Primary Care Groups (now Primary Care Trusts) that amalgamated GP fundholders together in an attempt to reintegrate general practitioners back into primary care systems, and also to bridge barriers between health and social care delivery.
The older industrial model of welfare in which different bureaucracies and different fundholders sorted-out problems for separate groups of income support clients, health care clients and housing clients creates as many problems as it solves.
The main fundholders - The Arts Council, Sandwell Council and regional development agency Advantage West Midlands - were forced to stump up an extra pounds 4 million each to keep the project going.
Thousands of organizations, such as health authorities, general practitioner fundholders, and NHS trusts, competed in the planning, funding, and delivery of health care in a way that hindered an appropriate coordination between them (Parliament 1997, 13).