funny paper


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funny paper

n.
A section or supplement of a newspaper containing comic strips.

funny paper

n
(Journalism & Publishing) US and Canadian a section or separate supplement of a newspaper, etc, containing comic strips

fun•ny

(ˈfʌn i)

adj. -ni•er, -ni•est, adj.
1. providing fun; amusing; comical: a funny joke.
2. attempting to amuse; facetious.
3. warranting suspicion; underhanded; deceitful: There was something funny about those extra charges.
4. Informal. insolent; impertinent: Don't get funny with me, mister.
5. curious; strange; peculiar; odd: Her speech has a funny twang.
n.
6. Informal. a funny remark or story; joke: to make a funny.
7. funnies,
a. comic strips.
b. Also called funny paper. the section of a newspaper reserved for comic strips, word games, etc.
adv.
8. Informal. peculiarly.
[1750–60]
fun′ni•ly, adv.
fun′ni•ness, n.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
He is the type that gives rise to the jokes in the funny papers.
And sometimes the funny paper came on its own, addressed to Arthur, all part of a concerted effort to get him to read, if only captions on cartoons.
His editor said his story was fine, but where were the funny paper titles?
The premiere issue of The Funny Paper had a mid-December launch in New York City.
The dirtier side of the funny papers is turned out in this gloriously nasty noir about a megalomaniac columnist (Burt Lancaster) and a desperate press agent (Tony Curtis).
cummings shows that "Krazy Kat" limned deeper themes than the normal fare of the funny papers.
Our children see plenty of violence and bullying in everyday life (say, by looking toward the White House) without seeing it regularly in the funny papers.
FUNNY PAPERS Tony and staff at Northside People pitching ideas to Brendan O'Carroll
First Bites" honors the author's memories and experiences related to WWII in pictures and verse, covering such topics as rationing, the funny papers, and VJ Day with specific events from the author's past.
You can also use the funny papers for a colorful recycled wrapping paper.
They took inspiration from consumer culture, from soap boxes to soup cans, flags to the funny papers, Marilyn Monroe to Mao.
By employing recognizable images from popular culture, such as Mickey Mouse (Look Mickey, 1961), and by incorporating the heavy black outlines, Benday dots and saturated primary colors of the funny papers, Roy Lichtenstein helped usher in a new visual vernacular perfectly suited to America's rapidly growing consumer culture.