furuncle

(redirected from furuncles)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to furuncles: impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis

fu·run·cle

 (fyo͝or′ŭng′kəl)
n.
See boil2.

[Latin fūrunculus, knob on a vine that "steals" the sap, diminutive of fūr, thief (modeled on latrunculus, robber, diminutive of latrō, latrōn-, bandit); see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

fu·run′cu·lar (fyo͝o-rŭng′kyə-lər), fu·run′cu·lous (-ləs) adj.

furuncle

(ˈfjʊərʌŋkəl)
n
(Pathology) pathol the technical name for boil2
[C17: from Latin fūrunculus pilferer, petty thief, sore on the body, from fūr thief]
furuncular, fuˈrunculous adj

boil1

(bɔɪl)
v.i.
1. to change from a liquid to a gaseous state, typically as a result of heat, producing bubbles of gas that rise to the surface of the liquid.
2. to reach the boiling point.
3. to be in an agitated or violent state: The sea boiled in the storm.
4. to be deeply angry or upset.
5. to contain, or be contained in, a liquid that boils: The kettle is boiling. Don't let the vegetables boil.
v.t.
6. to bring to the boiling point.
7. to cook (something) in boiling water: to boil eggs.
8. to separate (salt, sugar, etc.) from a solution containing it by boiling off the liquid.
9. boil down,
a. to reduce or lessen by boiling.
b. to shorten; abridge.
10. boil down to, to be reduced to; amount to: It boils down to a question of ethics.
11. boil over,
a. to overflow while or as if while boiling; erupt.
b. to be unable to repress anger, excitement, etc.
n.
12. the act or state of boiling: Bring the water to a boil.
13. an area of agitated, swirling water.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French boillir < Latin bullīre to effervesce, boil, v. derivative of bulla bubble]
syn: boil, seethe, simmer, stew are used figuratively to refer to agitated states of emotion. To boil suggests being very hot with anger or rage: He was boiling when the guests arrived late. To seethe is to be deeply stirred, violently agitated, or greatly excited: a mind seething with conflicting ideas. To simmer means to be at the point of bursting out or boiling over: to simmer with curiosity; to simmer with anger. To stew is an informal term that means to worry, or to be in a restless state of anxiety and excitement: to stew over one's troubles.

boil2

(bɔɪl)

n.
a painful circumscribed inflammation of the skin with a pus-filled inner core.
[before 1000; Middle English bile, bule, Old English bȳle; c. Old Saxon bula, Old High German bulla; akin to Old Norse beyla hump]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.furuncle - a painful sore with a hard core filled with pus
gumboil - a boil or abscess on the gums
staphylococcal infection - an infection with staphylococcus bacteria; usually marked by abscess formation
Translations

fu·run·cle

n. furúnculo; pop. grano enterrado.

furuncle

n forúnculo, infección f de un folículo piloso
References in periodicals archive ?
PVL production has been preferentially linked to furuncles, cutaneous abscesses, and severe necrotic skin infections.
It causes skin and soft tissue infections such as furuncles (boils), folliculitis, abscess (particularly breast abscess), wound infections; infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and urinary tract infections; musculoskeletal infections such as osteomyelitis, arthritis and endovascular infections such as bacteraemia, septicaemia, endocarditis.
A 69-year-old male patient, with history of multiple furuncles for two months, without improvement after the use of cephalexin and amoxicillin/clavulanate for 20 days, and daily fever for a week.
The most common presentations are papules, pustules, nodules, furuncles, verrucose plaques, abscesses, and ulcerations, with a tendency to fistulization and seropurulent drainage, and leaving retractile and deforming scars.
Flos Lonicerae japonicae (FLJ), Jinyinhua which is derived from the dried flower buds of LJT, has also been used for the treatment of exopathogenic wind-heat or epidemic febrile diseases, sores and furuncles for centuries.
10,11] Mupirocin is indicated for the treatment of furuncles, impetigo, and traumatic skin lesions.
The IDSA guideline states that the duration of treatment for impetigo is 7 days, for cellulitis is 5 days, and for furuncles and carbuncles no duration is stated, but they allow no antibiotics be used at all if the patient is not febrile and white blood cell count is not elevated after incision and drainage (Clin Infect Dis.
The same goes not just for skin cancers but for furuncles, lipomas, and so on.
Natives of Mali use the plant for malaria, joint pains, inflammation, intestinal parasites, furuncles, and wounds.
The main factor contributing to its high incidence in the wounds is the fact that the PVL gene is a bicomponent cytotoxin that is preferentially linked to furuncles, cutaneous abscesses and severe necrotic skin infections.
Without therapeutic intervention, the disease typically progresses to form more fluctuant and more painful, subcutaneous nodules that resemble large furuncles.
Among the list of possible diagnoses in patients with early HS lesions based on clinical :appearance alone, the most common and most likely are furuncles, folliculitis, and atypically dilated comedones of acne vulgaris.