fussily


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fuss·y

 (fŭs′ē)
adj. fuss·i·er, fuss·i·est
1. Easily upset; given to bouts of ill temper: a fussy baby.
2. Paying great or excessive attention to personal tastes and appearance; fastidious: He was always fussy about clothes.
3. Calling for or requiring great attention to sometimes trivial details: a fussy actuarial problem.
4. Full of superfluous details: "It can indeed be fussy, filling with ornament what should be empty space" (H.D.F. Kitto).

fuss′i·ly adv.
fuss′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.fussily - in a fussy manner; "he spoke to her fussily"
Translations
بِتَدقيق في الأمور التافِهَه
úzkostlivě
kræsentoverpylretoverpyntet
kicsinyeskedve
meî smámunasemi
telâşlatitizlikle

fussily

[ˈfʌsɪlɪ] ADV
1. (= demandingly) (pej) → quisquillosamente; (= scrupulously) → meticulosamente, escrupulosamente
2. (= elaborately) [designed, dressed] → de manera recargada
3. (= nervously) → nerviosamente

fussily

[ˈfʌsɪli] adv
[arrange] → de façon tarabiscotée
[ornate] → de façon tarabiscotée; [accurate, bureaucratic] → de façon méticuleuse

fussily

adv (pej)
(= painstakingly) adjust, checkübertrieben sorgfältig; accuratepeinlich; legalisticübertrieben
(= ornately)überladen; fussily designed wrought-iron gatesschmiedeeiserne Tore mit verschnörkeltem Muster; fussily dressedverspielt gekleidet

fussily

[ˈfʌsɪlɪ] advmeticolosamente
she was fussily dressed → era carica di fronzoli

fuss

(fas) noun
unnecessary excitement, worry or activity, often about something unimportant. Don't make such a fuss.
verb
to be too concerned with or pay too much attention to (unimportant) details. She fusses over children.
ˈfussy adjective
1. too concerned with details; too particular; difficult to satisfy. She is very fussy about her food.
2. (of clothes etc) with too much decoration. a very fussy hat.
ˈfussily adverb
make a fuss of
to pay a lot of attention to. He always makes a fuss of his grandchildren.
References in classic literature ?
A large bell rang in the lower regions -- quick, shambling footsteps pattered on the stone corridor outside -- the door opened suddenly -- and a tall lean yellow old man, sharp as to his eyes, shrewd as to his lips, fussily restless as to all his movements, entered the room, with two huge Labrador dogs at his heels, and took his seat in a violent hurry.
How is it," she began, as usual in French, settling down briskly and fussily in the easy chair, "how is it Annette never got married?
They could not sit down, because all Billina's chairs were roosting-poles made of silver; so they had to stand while the hen fussily showed them her treasures.
While these words were being spoken, Pesca, happily and fussily unconscious of the irreparable wrong which the crockery had suffered at his hands, was dragging a large arm-chair to the opposite end of the room, so as to command us all three, in the character of a public speaker addressing an audience.
Yes, yes, I'll come," he answered, getting up fussily.
Charles declares himself "alone" - Prince Philip's gone too - although Camilla (Penelope Beaumont) is fussily at his shoulder.
From the fussily decorated premises in the winding, old town alleys to the giant Ferris wheel, the magnificent marina, museums, art galleries and the magical market selling delightful handicrafts, this is Christmas posh.
The dark patterning on the fabric is hair--the stuff that we fussily coif when it's still attached to us and pick off disgustedly when it's not.
He'd led illustration classes in the city's most ivy-garlanded and fussily selective institutions--the College of Visual Arts, the University of Minnesota, the Minneapolis School of Art and Design--where he warned his students not to go to art school ("because if you end up not doing art, you'll have only a really shitty education to fall back on"); he'd had solo shows in various downtown galleries where people sipped wine and whispered praise behind his back; he was frequently solicited to design magazine covers and images for the city's best-funded publications; for a time he'd had a weekly column in the state's most widely read newspaper, the Star Tribune, in which he warned people not to go to museum exhibits ("because nothing interesting or provocative can ever happen in a museum").
Simon takes a hotel room, fussily furnishing it with roses.
For many years he has been the best referee in England, and some of the reasons are that he allows games to flow, does not punish players fussily for trivial infringements, but does stop play and produce cards whenever it is necessary to ensure the safety of players.