fustian


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Related to fustian: habergeon

fus·tian

 (fŭs′chən)
n.
1.
a. A coarse sturdy cloth made of cotton and linen or flax.
b. Any of several thick twilled cotton fabrics, such as corduroy, having a short nap.
2. Pretentious speech or writing; pompous language.
adj.
1. Made of or as if of fustian: "[He] disliked the heavy, fustian ... and brocaded decor of Soviet officialdom" (Frederick Forsyth).
2. Pompous, bombastic, and ranting: "Yossarian was unmoved by the fustian charade of the burial ceremony" (Joseph Heller).

[Middle English fusten, fustian, from Old French fustaigne, from Medieval Latin fūstāneum, fūstiāneum (translation of Greek xulinos, made of cotton, from xulon, wood, cotton (cotton being so called because it comes from a woody shrub, unlike linen)) : Medieval Latin fūstis, wooden stick, tree trunk (from Latin, club; see fusty) + Latin -āneum, neuter of -āneus, adj. suffix. Noun, sense 2, and adjective, sense 2, probably from the fact that the nappy fustian of the 1500s was considered a cheap imitation of velvet, or perhaps from the use of fustian to cover cushions and pillows (that is, "padding") .]

fustian

(ˈfʌstɪən)
n
1. (Textiles)
a. a hard-wearing fabric of cotton mixed with flax or wool with a slight nap
b. (as modifier): a fustian jacket.
2. pompous or pretentious talk or writing
adj
3. cheap; worthless
4. pompous; bombastic
[C12: from Old French fustaigne, from Medieval Latin fustāneum, from Latin fustis cudgel]

fus•tian

(ˈfʌs tʃən)

n.
1. a stout fabric of cotton and flax.
2. a fabric of stout twilled cotton or of cotton and low-quality wool, with a short nap or pile.
3. inflated or turgid language in writing or speaking.
adj.
4. made of fustian.
5. pompous or bombastic, as language.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Old French fustaigne < Medieval Latin fūstāneum]

fustian

a high-flown, bombastic style of writing or speaking. — fustianist, n.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
a high-flown, bombastic style of writing or speaking. — fustianist, n.
See also: Language Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fustian - pompous or pretentious talk or writingfustian - pompous or pretentious talk or writing
grandiloquence, grandiosity, magniloquence, ornateness, rhetoric - high-flown style; excessive use of verbal ornamentation; "the grandiosity of his prose"; "an excessive ornateness of language"
2.fustian - a strong cotton and linen fabric with a slight nap
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"

fustian

noun
Pretentious, pompous speech or writing:
adjective
Characterized by language that is elevated and sometimes pompous in style:
Translations

fustian

n (Tex) → Barchent m
adj
(Tex) → aus Barchent
(fig, = pompous) → schwülstig
References in classic literature ?
Thus the heroe is always introduced with a flourish of drums and trumpets, in order to rouse a martial spirit in the audience, and to accommodate their ears to bombast and fustian, which Mr Locke's blind man would not have grossly erred in likening to the sound of a trumpet.
There were many classes of people here, from the labouring man in his fustian jacket, to the broken-down spendthrift in his shawl dressing-gown, most appropriately out at elbows; but there was the same air about them all--a kind of listless, jail-bird, careless swagger, a vagabondish who's-afraid sort of bearing, which is wholly indescribable in words, but which any man can understand in one moment if he wish, by setting foot in the nearest debtors' prison, and looking at the very first group of people he sees there, with the same interest as Mr.
While he was taken up with these vagaries, then, the time and the hour- an unlucky one for him- arrived for the Asturian to come, who in her smock, with bare feet and her hair gathered into a fustian coif, with noiseless and cautious steps entered the chamber where the three were quartered, in quest of the carrier; but scarcely had she gained the door when Don Quixote perceived her, and sitting up in his bed in spite of his plasters and the pain of his ribs, he stretched out his arms to receive his beauteous damsel.
Men with the blue jersey and peaked cap of the boatman, or the white ducks of the dockers, began to replace the cardurys and fustian of the laborers.
A waistcoat of broadcloth or of fustian is alike to an aching heart, and we laugh no merrier on velvet cushions than we did on wooden chairs.
His coat was of fustian and was stained with rust from his armor, for he had just come back from fighting, and was still clad in his war-worn clothes.
He had small twinkling eyes, and a pock-marked face; wore a fur cap, a dark corduroy jacket, greasy fustian trousers, and an apron.
There had been singing under the windows after midnight,--supernatural singing, Maggie always felt, in spite of Tom's contemptuous insistence that the singers were old Patch, the parish clerk, and the rest of the church choir; she trembled with awe when their carolling broke in upon her dreams, and the image of men in fustian clothes was always thrust away by the vision of angels resting on the parted cloud.
The pipes began to be puffed in a silence which had an air of severity; the more important customers, who drank spirits and sat nearest the fire, staring at each other as if a bet were depending on the first man who winked; while the beer-drinkers, chiefly men in fustian jackets and smock-frocks, kept their eyelids down and rubbed their hands across their mouths, as if their draughts of beer were a funereal duty attended with embarrassing sadness.
A jupon of dark blue cloth, tagged with buckles and pendants of gold, seemed but a sombre and plain attire amidst the wealth of silk and ermine and gilt tissue of fustian with which he was surrounded.
Nicholas assisted his master to put on an old fustian shooting- jacket, which he took down from a peg in the passage; and Squeers, arming himself with his cane, led the way across a yard, to a door in the rear of the house.
No one objected, so each boy filled the fustian bag he carried full of stones.