gable


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Related to gable: Clark Gable, gable vent

ga·ble

 (gā′bəl)
n.
1.
a. The generally triangular section of wall at the end of a pitched roof, occupying the space between the two slopes of the roof.
b. The whole end wall of a building or wing having a pitched roof.
2. A triangular, usually ornamental architectural section, as one above an arched door or window.

[Middle English gable, gavel, from Norman French gable (perhaps of Celtic origin) and from Old Norse gafl; see ghebh-el- in Indo-European roots.]

ga′bled adj.

gable

(ˈɡeɪbəl)
n
1. (Architecture) the triangular upper part of a wall between the sloping ends of a pitched roof
2. (Architecture) a triangular ornamental feature in the form of a gable, esp as used over a door or window
3. (Architecture) the triangular wall on both ends of a gambrel roof
[C14: Old French gable, probably from Old Norse gafl; related to Old English geafol fork, Old High German gibil gable]
ˈgabled adj
ˈgable-ˌlike adj

Gable

(ˈɡeɪbəl)
n
(Biography) (William) Clark. 1901–60, US film actor. His films include It Happened One Night (1934), San Francisco (1936), Gone with the Wind (1939), Mogambo (1953), and The Misfits (1960)

ga•ble

(ˈgeɪ bəl)

n.
1. the portion of the front or side of a building, usu. triangular in shape, enclosed by or masking the end of a roof that slopes downward from a central ridge.
2. a decorative architectural feature suggesting a triangular gable.
3. Also called ga′ble wall`. a wall topped by a gable.
[1325–75; Middle English < Old French (of Germanic orig.); c. Old Norse gafl; compare Old English gafol, geafel a fork]
ga′bled, adj.
ga′ble•like`, adj.

Ga•ble

(ˈgeɪ bəl)

n.
(William) Clark, 1901–60, U.S. film actor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gable - the vertical triangular wall between the sloping ends of gable roofgable - the vertical triangular wall between the sloping ends of gable roof
bell gable - an extension of a gable that serves as a bell cote
corbie gable - (architecture) a gable having corbie-steps or corbel steps
pediment - a triangular gable between a horizontal entablature and a sloping roof
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
2.gable - United States film actor (1901-1960)Gable - United States film actor (1901-1960)
Translations
سَقْف هَرَمي
štít
gavl
oromfal
húsgafl
dvišlaitis
frontons
üçgen çatının ön duvarı

gable

[ˈgeɪbl]
A. Naguilón m, gablete m
B. CPD gable end Nhastial m
gable roof Ntejado m de dos aguas

gable

[ˈgeɪbəl] npignon m

gable

nGiebel m

gable

:
gable end
nGiebelwand or -seite f
gable window
nGiebelfenster nt

gable

[ˈgeɪbl] nfrontone m

gable

(ˈgeibl) noun
the triangular part of the side wall of a building between the sloping parts of the roof.
ˈgabled adjective
a gabled roof.
References in classic literature ?
On the triangular portion of the gable, that fronted next the street, was a dial, put up that very morning, and on which the sun was still marking the passage of the first bright hour in a history that was not destined to be all so bright.
Across the gable that fronted the road, and about ten feet above the ground, ran a narrow porch, with a wooden railing; a row of small windows filled with very small panes looked upon the porch.
Tom partly uncovered a dismal caricature of a house with two gable ends to it and a corkscrew of smoke issuing from the chimney.
I'd not exchange, for a thousand lives, my condition here, for Edgar Linton's at Thrushcross Grange - not if I might have the privilege of flinging Joseph off the highest gable, and painting the house- front with Hindley's blood
It arose out of a scuffle between two churchwardens, one of whom was alleged to have pushed the other against a pump; the handle of which pump projecting into a school-house, which school-house was under a gable of the church-roof, made the push an ecclesiastical offence.
Over the gable were "two golden apples, in which were two carbuncles," so that the gold might shine by day and the carbuncles by night.
Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east the line was broken by the entry of a court; and just at that point a certain sinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the street.
Before us lay a green sloping land full of forests and woods, with here and there steep hills, crowned with clumps of trees or with farmhouses, the blank gable end to the road.
Then, with a whistling note that rose above the droning of the pit, the beam swung close over their heads, lighting the tops of the beech trees that line the road, and splitting the bricks, smashing the windows, firing the window frames, and bring- ing down in crumbling ruin a portion of the gable of the house nearest the corner.
He had commenced his labors, in the first year of their residence, by erecting a tall, gaunt edifice of wood, with its gable toward the highway.
The floor was sunk about six feet below the surface of the ground, with a low door at the gable end, extremely narrow, and partly sunk.
At the entrance to the village was a cottage whose gable jutted into the road, and before applying for a lodging she stood under its shelter, and watched the evening close in.