gage


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Related to gage: gauge

gage 1

 (gāj)
n.
1. Something deposited or given as security against an obligation; a pledge.
2. Something, such as a glove, that is offered or thrown down as a pledge or challenge to fight.
3. A challenge.
tr.v. gaged, gag·ing, gag·es Archaic
1. To pledge as security.
2. To offer as a stake in a bet; wager.

[Middle English, from Old French, of Germanic origin.]

gage 2

 (gāj)
n.
Any of several varieties of plum, such as the greengage.

[After Sir William Gage, (1656?-1727), English botanist.]

gage 3

 (gāj)
n. & v.
Variant of gauge.

gage

(ɡeɪdʒ)
n
1. (Commerce) something deposited as security against the fulfilment of an obligation; pledge
2. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a glove or other object thrown down to indicate a challenge to combat
vb
(tr) archaic to stake, pledge, or wager
[C14: from Old French gage, of Germanic origin; compare Gothic wadi pledge]

gage

(ɡeɪdʒ)
n
(Plants) short for greengage

gage

(ɡeɪdʒ)
n
old-fashioned slang US marijuana
[C20: of uncertain origin; compare ganja]

gage

(ɡeɪdʒ)
n, vb
(Mechanical Engineering) US a variant spelling (esp in technical senses) of gauge

Gage

(ɡeɪdʒ)
n
(Biography) Thomas. 1721–87, British general and governor in America; commander in chief of British forces at Bunker Hill (1775)

gage1

(geɪdʒ)

n.
1. something, as a glove, thrown down by a medieval knight in token of challenge to combat.
2. Archaic. to pledge, stake, or wager.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Germanic]

gage2

(geɪdʒ)

n. (chiefly in technical use)

Gage

(geɪdʒ)

n.
Thomas, 1721–87, British general in America 1763–76.

gage

- In "engage," it means "pledge, promise."
See also related terms for promise.

Gage

 a small quantity—Slang Dictionary, 1874.
Examples: gage of gin, 1874; of tobacco, 1834.

gage


Past participle: gaged
Gerund: gaging

Imperative
gage
gage
Present
I gage
you gage
he/she/it gages
we gage
you gage
they gage
Preterite
I gaged
you gaged
he/she/it gaged
we gaged
you gaged
they gaged
Present Continuous
I am gaging
you are gaging
he/she/it is gaging
we are gaging
you are gaging
they are gaging
Present Perfect
I have gaged
you have gaged
he/she/it has gaged
we have gaged
you have gaged
they have gaged
Past Continuous
I was gaging
you were gaging
he/she/it was gaging
we were gaging
you were gaging
they were gaging
Past Perfect
I had gaged
you had gaged
he/she/it had gaged
we had gaged
you had gaged
they had gaged
Future
I will gage
you will gage
he/she/it will gage
we will gage
you will gage
they will gage
Future Perfect
I will have gaged
you will have gaged
he/she/it will have gaged
we will have gaged
you will have gaged
they will have gaged
Future Continuous
I will be gaging
you will be gaging
he/she/it will be gaging
we will be gaging
you will be gaging
they will be gaging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gaging
you have been gaging
he/she/it has been gaging
we have been gaging
you have been gaging
they have been gaging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gaging
you will have been gaging
he/she/it will have been gaging
we will have been gaging
you will have been gaging
they will have been gaging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gaging
you had been gaging
he/she/it had been gaging
we had been gaging
you had been gaging
they had been gaging
Conditional
I would gage
you would gage
he/she/it would gage
we would gage
you would gage
they would gage
Past Conditional
I would have gaged
you would have gaged
he/she/it would have gaged
we would have gaged
you would have gaged
they would have gaged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gage - street names for marijuanagage - street names for marijuana    
cannabis, ganja, marihuana, marijuana - the most commonly used illicit drug; considered a soft drug, it consists of the dried leaves of the hemp plant; smoked or chewed for euphoric effect
2.gage - a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc.gage - a measuring instrument for measuring and indicating a quantity such as the thickness of wire or the amount of rain etc.
anemometer, wind gage, wind gauge - a gauge for recording the speed and direction of wind
depth gage, depth gauge - a gauge for measuring the depth of grooves or holes or other concavities
dipstick - a graduated rod dipped into a container to indicate the fluid level
gas gage, gas gauge, gasoline gage, gasoline gauge, petrol gage, petrol gauge - gauge that indicates the amount of gasoline left in the gasoline tank of a vehicle
measuring device, measuring instrument, measuring system - instrument that shows the extent or amount or quantity or degree of something
pressure gage, pressure gauge - gauge for measuring and indicating fluid pressure
pluviometer, rain gage, rain gauge, udometer - gauge consisting of an instrument to measure the quantity of precipitation
strain gage, strain gauge - a gauge for measuring strain in a surface
scribing block, surface gage, surface gauge - gauge consisting of a scriber mounted on an adjustable stand; used to test the accuracy of plane surfaces
vacuum gage, vacuum gauge - a gauge for indicating negative atmospheric pressure
water gage, water gauge, water glass - gauge for indicating the level of water in e.g. a tank or boiler or reservoir
wire gage, wire gauge - gauge for measuring the diameter of wire
Verb1.gage - place a bet ongage - place a bet on; "Which horse are you backing?"; "I'm betting on the new horse"
ante - place one's stake
parlay, double up - stake winnings from one bet on a subsequent wager
wager, bet, play - stake on the outcome of an issue; "I bet $100 on that new horse"; "She played all her money on the dark horse"

gauge

also gage
noun
A means by which individuals are compared and judged:
verb
1. To ascertain the dimensions, quantity, or capacity of:
Archaic: mete.
2. To make a judgment as to the worth or value of:
Translations

gauge

(also, especially American) gage (geidʒ) verb
1. to measure (something) very accurately. They gauged the hours of sunshine.
2. to estimate, judge. Can you gauge her willingness to help?
noun
1. an instrument for measuring amount, size, speed etc. a petrol gauge.
2. a standard size (of wire, bullets etc). gauge wire.
3. the distance between the rails of a railway line.

gage

vt. medir, calibrar.
References in classic literature ?
When the stage-driver found us unable to pay our fare, he held on upon our bag- gage as security for the debt.
From this station, as I pleased myself with imagining, Gage may have beheld his disastrous victory on Bunker Hill (unless one of the tri-mountains intervened), and Howe have marked the approaches of Washington's besieging army; although the buildings since erected in the vicinity have shut out almost every object, save the steeple of the Old South, which seems almost within arm's length.
The shape of Gage, as true as in a looking-glass," exclaimed Lord Percy, turning pale.
No, surely," cried Miss Joliffe, laughing hysterically; "it could not be Gage, or Sir William would have greeted his old comrade in arms
General Gage, an officer of the old French War, and since commander-in- chief of the British forces in America, was appointed governor in his stead.
Soon after General Gage became governor a great many troops had arrived, and were encamped upon the Common.
General Gage sent eight hundred soldiers to Concord, about eighteen miles from Boston, to destroy some ammunition and provisions which the colonists had collected there.
General Gage and his troops were cooped up within the narrow precincts of the peninsula.
The whole country was then a wilderness, and it was necessary to transport the bag gage of the troops by means of the rivers—a devious but practicable route.
We now throw down the gage to the capital of the world.
A dirty or rusty gage won't give an accurate reading.
Because the gage is wireless, the new M1 Wave Sweep Gage relieves operators of twisted cables that result in early failure through cord breakage, and eliminates all their maintenance costs.