gaiety


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gai·e·ty

also gay·e·ty  (gā′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. gai·e·ties also gay·e·ties
1. A state of joyful exuberance or merriment; vivacity.
2. Merry or joyful activity; festivity: making preparations for the holiday gaieties.
3. Bright color or showiness, as of dress; finery.

[French gaieté, from Old French, from gai, cheerful; see gay.]

gaiety

(ˈɡeɪətɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or condition of being merry, bright, or lively
2. festivity; merrymaking
Also (esp US): gayety
Usage: See at gay

gai•e•ty

(ˈgeɪ ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality or state of being gay or cheerful; merriment.
2. Often, gaieties. merrymaking or festivity: the gaieties of the New Year season.
3. showiness; finery: gaiety of dress.
Sometimes, gayety.
[1625–35; < French gaieté=gai gay + -té -ty2]

Gaiety

 

See Also: CHEERFULNESS, LAUGHTER

  1. As merry as a grig —Frank Swinnerton
  2. As merry as a mouse in malt —George Garrett
  3. As merry as forty beggars —Proverb
  4. As merry as notes in a tune —Dame Edith Sitwell
  5. As merry as the day is long —William Shakespeare Shakespeare used this in both Much Ado About Nothing and The Life and Death of King John. In daily conversation, ‘cheerful’ is often substituted for ‘merry.’
  6. Gay as the latest statistics on cancer or crime —Elyse Sommer
  7. (Yours is) a spirit like a May-day song —Dorothy Parker
  8. Blithe as the air is, and as free —Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  9. Cavorted like a mule let out to pasture —Borden Deal
  10. Feeling like Fourth of July —Stephen Vincent Benét
  11. The gaiety of life, like the beauty and the moral worth of life, is a saving grace, which to ignore is folly, and to destroy is a crime —Agnes Repplier
  12. Gay as a funeral procession —Anon
  13. As merry as a condemned man eating his last meal —Elyse Sommer
  14. Gay as a honey-bee humming in June —Amy Lowell
  15. Gay as a parade —Hilda Conklin
  16. Gay as larks —Aesop The use of “gay as” and “merry as” comparisons to larks, crickets and just about any kind of humming or buzzing bird or insect abounds throughout the annals of literature as well as in daily speech.
  17. Heart … lighter than a flower —Elinor Wylie
  18. Making merry like grasshoppers —Robinson Jeffers
  19. A man without mirth is like a wagon without springs, in which one is caused disagreeably to jolt by every pebble over which it turns —Henry Ward Beecher Were Beecher alive today he might substitute “A car without shock absorbers” for “A wagon without springs.”
  20. (Everything went as) merrily as a marriage bell —W. Somerset Maugham
  21. A merry heart does good like a medicine —The Holy Bible /Proverbs The word ‘doeth’ has been modernized to ‘does,’ and the simile is often shortened to “A merry heart is like medicine.”
  22. Mirth is like a flash of lightning, that breaks through a loom of clouds, and glitters for a moment —Joseph Addison
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gaiety - a gay feelinggaiety - a gay feeling        
happiness - emotions experienced when in a state of well-being
jocularity, jocundity - a feeling facetious merriment
jolliness, jollity, joviality - feeling jolly and jovial and full of good humor
2.gaiety - a festive merry feeling
levity - feeling an inappropriate lack of seriousness

gaiety

gaiety

noun
Translations
بَهْجَه ، مَرَحمَرَح، جَذَل
jásavostzábava
festfestlighedlystighedmunterhed
vigalom
glaîværî, kátínagleîskapur
neşeneşeli olmaşenlik

gaiety

[ˈgeɪɪtɪ] N
1. [of occasion, person] → alegría f
2. [of dress, costumes] → colorido m, vistosidad f

gaiety

[ˈgeɪɪti] ngaieté f

gaiety

n (= cheerfulness)Fröhlichkeit f, → Heiterkeit f; (usu pl: = merrymaking) → Vergnügung f

gaiety

[ˈgeɪɪtɪ] nallegria, gaiezza

gay

(gei) adjective
1. happy or making people happy. The children were gay and cheerful; gay music.
2. bright. gay colours.
3. homosexual. gay liberation; gay rights.
noun
homosexual.
ˈgaily adverb
gaiety (ˈgeiəti) noun
1. (an occasion of) fun or happiness. They joined in the gaiety.
2. the state of being gay. the gaiety of the music.
References in classic literature ?
This gaiety did not impose upon anybody, but they tried to look as if it did for his sake, and he got on very well till Mrs.
Always when she had thought of the matter, it had seemed to her that in town all must be gaiety and life, that there men and women must live happily and freely, giving and taking friendship and affection as one takes the feel of a wind on the cheek.
Her sudden illness, when the gaiety was at its height, her pallor, the handkerchief she crushed against her lips, the cough she smothered under the laughter while Gaston kept playing the piano lightly--it all wrung my heart.
Had he once found power to smile, and wear a face of gaiety, there would have been no such man!
I shall never forget the sweetness and gaiety with which he brought out the word, nor how, on top of it, he bent forward and kissed me.
All seemed pleasure, joy, and roguish gaiety, only one of the numerous guests had a gloomy exterior; but exactly the black armor in which he walked about excited general attention, and his tall figure, as well as the noble propriety of his movements, attracted especially the regards of the ladies.
She was in gay spirits, and would have prolonged the conversation, wanting to hear the particulars of his suspicions, every look described, and all the wheres and hows of a circumstance which highly entertained her: but his gaiety did not meet hers.
From every enjoyment I was, of course, excluded: my share of the gaiety consisted in witnessing the daily apparelling of Eliza and Georgiana, and seeing them descend to the drawing-room, dressed out in thin muslin frocks and scarlet sashes, with hair elaborately ringletted; and afterwards, in listening to the sound of the piano or the harp played below, to the passing to and fro of the butler and footman, to the jingling of glass and china as refreshments were handed, to the broken hum of conversation as the drawing-room door opened and closed.
Again, as the three go on arm-in-arm, and I linger behind alone, I follow some of those looks, and wonder if my mother's step be really not so light as I have seen it, and if the gaiety of her beauty be really almost worried away.
I have often thought about the top and its spinner, as I have noted the absorbed faces of other people's pleasures in the streets,--two lovers passing along the crowded Strand with eyes only for each other; a student deep in his book in the corner of an omnibus; a young mother glowing over the child in her arms; the wild-eyed musician dreamily treading on everybody's toes, and begging nobody's pardon; the pretty little Gaiety Girl hurrying to rehearsal with no thought but of her own sweet self and whether there will be a letter from Harry at the stage- door,--yes, if we are alone in our griefs, we are no less alone in our pleasures.
But his ruddy embrowned cheek-bones could be plainly seen, and the large and bright blue eyes, that flashed from under the dark shade of the raised visor; and the whole gesture and look of the champion expressed careless gaiety and fearless confidence a mind which was unapt to apprehend danger, and prompt to defy it when most imminent yet with whom danger was a familiar thought, as with one whose trade was war and adventure.
There was a wild recklessness of gaiety in his manner as he sat at table, but now and then a thrill of terror ran through him when he remembered that, pressed against the window of the conservatory, like a white handkerchief, he had seen the face of James Vane watching him.