gainsayer


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Related to gainsayer: renouncement, endeared

gain·say

 (gān-sā′, gān′sā′)
tr.v. gain·said (-sād′, -sĕd′), gain·say·ing, gain·says (-sāz′, -sĕz′)
1. To declare to be false; deny. See Synonyms at deny.
2. To oppose (someone), especially by contradiction: "She was going to fashion the end of her existence in her own way, and in this determination she would not be gainsaid" (Louis Auchincloss).

[Middle English gainsayen : gain-, against (from Old English gegn-) + sayen, to say (from Old English secgan; see say).]

gain·say′er n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The price of authority, in other words, is self-nullification: in view of this difficulty, the narrator cites Kierkegaard's admonition--"Learn to speak without authority"--and, having in so doing made an authority of the gainsayer of authority, is caught in the kind of absurdity exemplified by the Liar Paradox in which an assertion and its disclaimer coincide (Coetzee 2007: 151).
Thacke, The Gainsayer Convinced (1649), 64, quoted in J.
Should any doubt the actuality of these essential moments, Cyril conveyed the sense that the events themselves in their entirety would aggressively rebuke the gainsayer.
even But it seems even James Bond, saviour of the universe several times over, can't overcome his feminist gainsayers.
Indeed, gainsayers, who are usually not themselves hands-on rock art researchers, have been unable to show any other fit that is anywhere as comprehensive or, more importantly, precisely explanatory.
4) Often, gainsayers lambaste the approach given that it is predicated on an increasingly meager active component of perhaps no more than 420,000 Soldiers when defense cuts and sequestration are complete no later than Fiscal Year 2021.
But leaving aside the gainsayers and sceptics, the sheer timescale of the scheme hailed as Britain's biggest infrastructure project - even if it goes ahead bang on schedule - should set alarm bells ringing.
This is not a criticism that can be leveled at the Tristan excerpt, though, whose other-worldly intensity is utterly Kleiber is not without his gainsayers, and several contributors aim to be as objective about him as possible.
WHILE I appreciate the sincerity of John Wilson's cri de coeur over wind turbines (Views of the North, May 25) all the gainsayers miss the point that the turbines are not permanent, they are part of an ever-changing landscape.