gait


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to gait: gait cycle

gait

 (gāt)
n.
1. A particular way or manner of moving on foot: a person who ran with a clumsy, hobbling gait.
2. Any of the ways, such as a canter, trot, or walk, by which a horse can move by lifting the feet in different order or rhythm.
3. Rate or manner of proceeding: The project went forward at a steady gait.
tr.v. gait·ed, gait·ing, gaits
To train (a horse) in a particular gait or gaits.

[Middle English gate, path, gait, from Old Norse gata, path; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]

gait

(ɡeɪt)
n
1. manner of walking or running; bearing
2. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (used esp of horses and dogs) the pattern of footsteps at various speeds, as the walk, trot, canter, etc, each pattern being distinguished by a particular rhythm and footfall
vb
(Horse Training, Riding & Manège) (tr) to teach (a horse) a particular gait
[C16: variant of gate1]

gait

(geɪt)
n.
1. a manner of walking, stepping, or running.
2. any of the manners in which a horse moves, as a walk, trot, canter, or gallop.
v.t.
3. to teach a specified gait to (a horse).
4. to lead (a dog) before judges to show its manner of moving.
[1500–10; Scots, Middle English sp. variant of gate1]

gait


Past participle: gaited
Gerund: gaiting

Imperative
gait
gait
Present
I gait
you gait
he/she/it gaits
we gait
you gait
they gait
Preterite
I gaited
you gaited
he/she/it gaited
we gaited
you gaited
they gaited
Present Continuous
I am gaiting
you are gaiting
he/she/it is gaiting
we are gaiting
you are gaiting
they are gaiting
Present Perfect
I have gaited
you have gaited
he/she/it has gaited
we have gaited
you have gaited
they have gaited
Past Continuous
I was gaiting
you were gaiting
he/she/it was gaiting
we were gaiting
you were gaiting
they were gaiting
Past Perfect
I had gaited
you had gaited
he/she/it had gaited
we had gaited
you had gaited
they had gaited
Future
I will gait
you will gait
he/she/it will gait
we will gait
you will gait
they will gait
Future Perfect
I will have gaited
you will have gaited
he/she/it will have gaited
we will have gaited
you will have gaited
they will have gaited
Future Continuous
I will be gaiting
you will be gaiting
he/she/it will be gaiting
we will be gaiting
you will be gaiting
they will be gaiting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gaiting
you have been gaiting
he/she/it has been gaiting
we have been gaiting
you have been gaiting
they have been gaiting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gaiting
you will have been gaiting
he/she/it will have been gaiting
we will have been gaiting
you will have been gaiting
they will have been gaiting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gaiting
you had been gaiting
he/she/it had been gaiting
we had been gaiting
you had been gaiting
they had been gaiting
Conditional
I would gait
you would gait
he/she/it would gait
we would gait
you would gait
they would gait
Past Conditional
I would have gaited
you would have gaited
he/she/it would have gaited
we would have gaited
you would have gaited
they would have gaited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gait - the rate of moving (especially walking or running)gait - the rate of moving (especially walking or running)
quick time - a normal marching pace of 120 steps per minute
double time - a fast marching pace (180 steps/min) or slow jog
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"
2.gait - a horse's manner of moving
locomotion, travel - self-propelled movement
walk - a slow gait of a horse in which two feet are always on the ground
single-foot, rack - a rapid gait of a horse in which each foot strikes the ground separately
jog trot - an easy gait of a horse; midway between a walk and a trot
trot - a gait faster than a walk; diagonally opposite legs strike the ground together
canter, lope - a smooth three-beat gait; between a trot and a gallop
gallop - a fast gait of a horse; a two-beat stride during which all four legs are off the ground simultaneously
3.gait - a person's manner of walking
walk, walking - the act of traveling by foot; "walking is a healthy form of exercise"
limp, hobble, hitch - the uneven manner of walking that results from an injured leg
flounce - the act of walking with exaggerated jerky motions
lurch, stagger, stumble - an unsteady uneven gait
pacing - walking with slow regular strides
roll - walking with a swaying gait
saunter - a careless leisurely gait; "he walked with a kind of saunter as if he hadn't a care in the world"
skip - a gait in which steps and hops alternate
angry walk, stalk - a stiff or threatening gait
prance, strut, swagger - a proud stiff pompous gait
waddle - walking with short steps and the weight tilting from one foot to the other; "ducks walk with a waddle"

gait

noun walk, step, bearing, pace, stride, carriage, tread, manner of walking His gait was peculiarly awkward.
Translations
مِشْيَه بَطيئَه
chůze
gang
askellajiastuntakäynti
járásmód
göngulag
gaita

gait

[geɪt] Npaso m, modo m de andar

gait

[ˈgeɪt] ndémarche f

gait

nGang m; (of horse)Gangart f; to have a rolling/shuffling gaiteinen schaukelnden/schlurfenden Gang haben; with an unsteady gaitmit unsicheren Schritten

gait

[geɪt] n (frm) → passo, andatura

gait

(geit) noun
(plural rare) the way in which a person or animal walks. the old man's shuffling gait.

gait

n. marcha, andar;
cerebellar ______ cerebelosa;
compensated gluteal ______ compensada glútea;
crutch ______ con muletas;
dorsiflexor ______ de dorsiflexión;
drag-to ______ de arrastre;
duck ______ de pato;
equine ______ equina;
festinating ______ festinante;
gastrocnemius ______ gemelar;
hemiplegic ______ hemipléjica;
petit pas ______ en pequeños pasos;
scissors ______ en tijeras;
spastic ______ espástica;
steppage ______ en estepaje;
tabetic ______ tabética;
three point ______ en tres apoyos;
Treadelenburg or gluteal ______ de Treadelenburg o glútea;
two point ______ en dos apoyos;
uncompensated gluteal ______ glútea descompensada;
waddling ______ de ánade.

gait

n marcha, forma de caminar
References in classic literature ?
A Fox asked him, "How can you pretend to prescribe for others, when you are unable to heal your own lame gait and wrinkled skin?
For several miles Worson went on very well, at an easy gait, without apparent fatigue, for he had really great powers of endurance and was not sufficiently intoxicated to enfeeble them.
Now, then -- your head's right, speed's right, shoulders right, eyes right, chin right, gait, carriage, general style right -- every- thing's right
I got my bag as I went a-groping through the hall, and in about a minute I was out the back way and stretching up the river road at a five-mile gait.
A dry-looking Englishman, in high boots and a short jacket, clean-shaven, except for a tuft below his chin, came to meet him, walking with the uncouth gait of jockey, turning his elbows out and swaying from side to side.
Though they were young they walked with bowed heads, which gait of grief the sun's rays smiled on pitilessly.
She's doing all she can--she's going her best gait, but it won't save her.
She liked the rapid gait at which they spun along, and the quick, sharp sound of the horses' hoofs on the hard road.
A peculiar walk in this old man, a certain slight but painful appearing yawing in his gait, had at an early period of the voyage excited the curiosity of the mariners.
He threw over him his scarlet mantle, put on his head a montera of green velvet trimmed with silver edging, flung across his shoulder the baldric with his good trenchant sword, took up a large rosary that he always carried with him, and with great solemnity and precision of gait proceeded to the antechamber where the duke and duchess were already dressed and waiting for him.
Slowly and carefully, therefore, I gained my feet, only to see that my watcher did the same; cautiously I advanced toward him, finding that by moving with a shuffling gait I could retain my balance as well as make reasonably rapid progress.
Here he had no longer that independence and that liberty of gait which he had when in the open seas, and his Nautilus felt itself cramped between the close shores of Africa and Europe.