gale


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gale 1

 (gāl)
n.
1.
a. A wind with a speed of from 34 to 40 knots (39 to 46 miles per hour; 63 to 74 kilometers per hour), according to the Beaufort scale. Also called fresh gale.
b. A storm at sea.
2. often gales A forceful outburst: gales of laughter.

[Origin unknown.]

gale 2

 (gāl)
n.
The sweet gale.

[Middle English gail, from Old English gagel.]

gale

(ɡeɪl)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a strong wind, specifically one of force seven to ten on the Beaufort scale or from 45 to 90 kilometres per hour
2. (often plural) a loud outburst, esp of laughter
3. archaic poetic a gentle breeze
[C16: of unknown origin]

gale

(ɡeɪl)
n
(Plants) short for sweet gale
[Old English gagel; related to Middle Low German gagel]

gale

(geɪl)

n.
1. a very strong wind.
2. a wind of 32–63 mph (14–28 m/sec).
3. a noisy outburst: a gale of laughter.
4. Archaic. a gentle breeze.
[1540–50; of uncertain orig.]

gale

- A very strong wind, probably related to Old Norse galinn, "frantic, mad."
See also related terms for mad.

gale

a strong wind, 28 to 55 knots on the Beaufort scale.
See also: Wind

Gale

 a wind of considerable strength, 1527; a state of current or passing emotions; the perfume or aroma of similar intangible things.
Examples: gale of animal spirits, 1663; of doubts and apprehensions, 1800; of fancy, 1675; of fragrance, 1820; of laughter; of merriment, 1894; of opportunity, 1669; of perfume, 1711; of praise, 1827; of wind, 1547.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gale - a strong wind moving 45-90 knotsgale - a strong wind moving 45-90 knots; force 7 to 10 on Beaufort scale
moderate gale, near gale - wind moving 32-38 knots; 7 on the Beaufort scale
fresh gale - wind moving 39-46 knots; 8 on the Beaufort scale
strong gale - wind moving 47-54 knots; 9 on the Beaufort scale
whole gale - wind moving 55-63 knots; 10 on the Beaufort scale
air current, current of air, wind - air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row"; "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere"

gale

noun
1. storm, hurricane, tornado, cyclone, whirlwind, blast, gust, typhoon, tempest, squall forecasts of fierce gales over the next few days
2. (Informal) outburst, scream, roar, fit, storm, shout, burst, explosion, outbreak, howl, shriek, eruption, peal, paroxysm gales of laughter from the audience

gale

noun
Archaic. A natural movement or current of air:
Translations
ريحٌ شديدَهعَاصِفَة
vichřice
stormkulingpors
myrskytuulinaurunpuuskasuomyrtti
vjetar
erõs szél
hvassviîri, stormur, rok
強風
질풍
vėtravėtros stiprumas
aukavētra
rýchlosť víchricevíchrica
vihar
kuling
ลมพายุ
cơn gió mạnh

gale

[geɪl]
A. N (= strong wind) → vendaval m, viento m fuerte; (= storm) (on land) → temporal m; (at sea) → temporal m, tempestad f
gale force tenvientos mpl de fuerza diez
it was blowing a gale that nightaquella noche había vendaval, aquella noche soplaban vientos fuertes
see also gale-force
B. CPD gale warning Naviso m de temporal

gale

[ˈgeɪl] n
(= wind) → coup m de vent
to blow a gale
It's blowing a gale out there! → C'est la tempête dehors!
gale force 10 → vent m de force 10
gales of laughter → grands éclats mpl de riregale-force wind nvent m soufflant en tempêtegale warning navis m de coup de vent

gale

n
Sturm m; it was blowing a galees stürmte, ein Sturm tobte or wütete; gale force 8Sturmstärke 8
(fig) gales of laughterLachsalven pl, → stürmisches Gelächter

gale

:
gale-force winds
gale warning
nSturmwarnung f

gale

[geɪl] n (strong wind) → bufera, vento forte; (at sea) → burrasca
gale force 10 → vento forza 10

gale

(geil) noun
a strong wind. Many trees were blown down in the gale.
gale force the speed or strength of a gale: The winds reached gale force;also adjective
gale-force winds.

gale

عَاصِفَة vichřice storm Sturm θύελλα vendaval myrskytuuli coup de vent vjetar vento forte 強風 질풍 storm kuling poryw wiatru ventania буря kuling ลมพายุ şiddetli rüzgar cơn gió mạnh 大风
References in classic literature ?
Gale left us, with strict injunctions to send for him instantly if she was taken ill again.
Tierra del Fuego, first arrival -- Good Success Bay -- An Account of the Fuegians on board -- Interview With the Savages -- Scenery of the Forests -- Cape Horn -- Wigwam Cove -- Miserable Condition of the Savages -- Famines -- Cannibals -- Matricide -- Religious Feelings -- Great Gale -- Beagle Channel -- Ponsonby Sound -- Build Wigwams and settle the Fuegians -- Bifurcation of the Beagle Channel -- Glaciers -- Return to the Ship -- Second Visit in the Ship to the Settlement -- Equality of Condition amongst the Natives.
For nine months of the year there is only ice and snow, and gale after gale, with a cold that no one can realise who has never seen the thermometer even at zero.
that we should take advantage of the strong gale which bore us on, and in place of beating back to Paris, make an attempt to reach the coast of North America.
From the first stir of the air felt on his cheek the gale seemed to take upon itself the accumulated impetus of an avalanche.
At last the wind rose to a fair gale, and we simply raced away from our pursuers as if they were standing still.
In a severe gale like this, while the ship is but a tossed shuttle-cock to the blast, it is by no means uncommon to see the needles in the compasses, at intervals, go round and round.
The wind, obstinately remaining in the north-west, blew a gale, and retarded the steamer.
Nothing but a gale can disturb the orderly life of the ship; and the spell of unshaken monotony that seems to have fallen upon the very voices of her men is broken only by the near prospect of a Landfall.
She will strain much less this way than in quartering across a gale.
For though their progenitors, the builders of Babel, must doubtless, by their tower, have intended to rear the loftiest mast-head in all Asia, or Africa either; yet (ere the final truck was put to it) as that great stone mast of theirs may be said to have gone by the board, in the dread gale of God's wrath; therefore, we cannot give these Babel builders priority over the Egyptians.
We have already reached a very high latitude; but it is the height of summer, and although not so warm as in England, the southern gales, which blow us speedily towards those shores which I so ardently desire to attain, breathe a degree of renovating warmth which I had not expected.