gallery


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gal·ler·y

 (găl′ə-rē)
n. pl. gal·ler·ies
1. A roofed promenade, especially one extending along the wall of a building and supported by arches or columns on the outer side.
2. A long enclosed passage, such as a hallway or corridor.
3.
a. A narrow balcony, usually having a railing or balustrade, along the outside of a building.
b. A projecting or recessed passageway along an upper story on the interior or exterior of a large building, generally marked by a colonnade or arcade.
c. Such a passageway situated over the aisle of a church and opening onto the nave. Also called tribune2.
4. Southwestern Gulf States See veranda.
5.
a. An upper section, often with a sloping floor, projecting from the rear or side walls of a theater or an auditorium to provide additional seating.
b. The seats in such a section, usually cheaper than those on the main floor.
c. The cheapest seats in a theater, generally those of the uppermost gallery.
d. The audience occupying a gallery or cheap section of a theater.
6. A large audience or group of spectators, as at a tennis or golf match.
7. The general public, usually considered as exemplifying a lack of discrimination or sophistication: accused the administration of playing to the gallery on the defense issue.
8.
a. A building, room, or website for the exhibition of artistic work.
b. An establishment that displays and sells works of art.
c. A photographer's studio.
9. A collection; an assortment: The trial featured a gallery of famous and flamboyant witnesses.
10.
a. An underground tunnel or passageway, as in a cave or one dug for military or mining purposes.
b. A tunnel or series of tunnels made by an animal.
11. Nautical A platform or balcony at the stern or quarters of some early sailing ships.
12. A decorative upright trimming or molding along the edge of a table top, tray, or shelf.

[Middle English galerie, from Old French, from Old North French galilee, galilee; see galilee.]

gal′ler·ied adj.
Our Living Language In Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, an open roofed porch that runs along at least one side of a house has been called a gallery: "Out on the small front gallery she had hung Bobinôt's Sunday clothes to air" (Kate Chopin). Craig M. Carver, the author of American Regional Dialects, points out that the word gallery, from Old French galerie, was borrowed into British English in the 15th century and was brought over to the American colonies by English-speaking settlers. Although the word in the sense "porch" did not survive in the American English of the East Coast, it was borrowed separately, probably from Acadian French, into the English of 18th-century Louisiana and there survived as part of the Southwestern Gulf dialect.

gallery

(ˈɡælərɪ)
n, pl -leries
1. (Art Terms) a room or building for exhibiting works of art
2. (Architecture) a covered passageway open on one side or on both sides. See also colonnade1
3. (Architecture)
a. a balcony running along or around the inside wall of a church, hall, etc
b. a covered balcony, sometimes with columns on the outside
4. (Theatre) theatre
a. an upper floor that projects from the rear over the main floor and contains the cheapest seats
b. the seats there
c. the audience seated there
5. (Architecture) a long narrow room, esp one used for a specific purpose: a shooting gallery.
6. (Commerce) chiefly US a building or room where articles are sold at auction
7. (Mining & Quarrying) an underground passage, as in a mine, the burrow of an animal, etc
8. (Theatre) theatre a narrow raised platform at the side or along the back of the stage for the use of technicians and stagehands
9. (Broadcasting) (in a TV studio) a glass-fronted soundproof room high up to one side of the studio looking into it. One gallery is used by the director and an assistant and one is for lighting, etc
10. (Nautical Terms) nautical a balcony or platform at the quarter or stern of a ship, sometimes used as a gun emplacement
11. (Furniture) a small ornamental metal or wooden balustrade or railing on a piece of furniture, esp one surrounding the top of a desk, table, etc
12. any group of spectators, as at a golf match
13. play to the gallery to try to gain popular favour, esp by crude appeals
[C15: from Old French galerie, from Medieval Latin galeria, probably from galilea galilee, a porch or chapel at entrance to medieval church]

gal•ler•y

(ˈgæl ə ri, ˈgæl ri)

n., pl. -ler•ies.
1. a raised area, often having a stepped or sloping floor, in a theater, church, or other public building to accommodate spectators, exhibits, etc.
2. the uppermost of such areas in a theater, usu. containing the cheapest seats.
3. the occupants of such an area in a theater.
4. the undiscriminating public.
5. any group of spectators or observers, as at a golf match or a legislative session.
6. a room, series of rooms, or building devoted to the exhibition and often the sale of works of art.
7. a long covered area, narrow and open at one or both sides, used esp. as a walk or corridor.
8. Chiefly South Atlantic States. a long porch or portico; veranda.
9. a long, relatively narrow room, esp. one for public use.
10. a raised, balconylike platform or passageway running along the exterior wall of a building inside or outside.
11. a large room or building used for photography, target practice, or other special purposes: a shooting gallery.
12. a collection or group: a gallery of misfits.
13. a projecting balcony or structure on the quarter or stern of a ship.
14. an ornamental railing surrounding the top of a table, desk, etc.
15. Mining. a level or drift.
16. an underground passageway in a mine, earthwork, or fortification.
17. a passageway made by an animal.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Old French galerie < Medieval Latin galeria, by dissimilation or suffix replacement from galilea, galilæa galilee]
gal′ler•ied, adj.
gal′ler•y•like`, adj.

Gallery

 the audience in the gallery, 1649, used in relation to a theatre or the political arena, e.g., ‘playing to the gallery’. See also audience.

gallery

The highest of the tiers of audience seating.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gallery - spectators at a golf or tennis match
audience - a gathering of spectators or listeners at a (usually public) performance; "the audience applauded"; "someone in the audience began to cough"
2.gallery - a porch along the outside of a building (sometimes partly enclosed)gallery - a porch along the outside of a building (sometimes partly enclosed)
lanai - a veranda or roofed patio often furnished and used as a living room
porch - a structure attached to the exterior of a building often forming a covered entrance
3.gallery - a room or series of rooms where works of art are exhibitedgallery - a room or series of rooms where works of art are exhibited
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
salon - gallery where works of art can be displayed
4.gallery - a long usually narrow room used for some specific purpose; "shooting gallery"
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
5.gallery - a covered corridor (especially one extending along the wall of a building and supported with arches or columns)
corridor - an enclosed passageway; rooms usually open onto it
6.gallery - narrow recessed balcony area along an upper floor on the interior of a building; usually marked by a colonnade
amphitheater, amphitheatre - a sloping gallery with seats for spectators (as in an operating room or theater)
balcony - a platform projecting from the wall of a building and surrounded by a balustrade or railing or parapet
choir loft - a gallery in a church occupied by the choir
organ loft - a gallery occupied by a church organ
7.gallery - a horizontal (or nearly horizontal) passageway in a mine; "they dug a drift parallel with the vein"
mining, excavation - the act of extracting ores or coal etc from the earth
passageway - a passage between rooms or between buildings

gallery

noun
1. exhibition room, museum, display room an art gallery
2. passage, hall, lobby, corridor, aisle, hallway, walkway, passageway, vestibule A crowd already filled the gallery.
3. upper circle, gods, balcony They had been forced to buy cheap tickets in the gallery.
Translations
شُرْفَهصالَة عَرْض، قاعَة متحَففي صالَة العَرْض أو الشُّرْفَهمَعْرِض
galeriena galerii
gallerigalleri-balkon
galleria
galerija
galériakarzat
á svölumgallerí, listasafnsvalir
画廊
화랑
balkonogalerija
balkona-balkonsgalerijagalerijas-
galériana galérii
galerija
galleri
ห้องแสดงภาพ
galeriüst balkon
phòng trưng bày nghệ thuật

gallery

[ˈgælərɪ] N (gen) → galería f (also Min, Theat); (for spectators) → tribuna f; (= art gallery) (state owned) → museo m de arte; (private) → galería f de arte
to play to the galleryactuar para la galería

gallery

[ˈgæləri] n
(also art gallery) → musée m
It's on the second floor of the gallery → C'est au second niveau du musée.
[art dealer] → galerie f
[hall] → galerie f
(for spectators)tribune f
(in theatre)dernier balcon m art gallery

gallery

n
(= balcony, corridor)Galerie f; (in church) → Empore f; (Theat) → oberster Rang, Balkon m, → Galerie f; to play to the gallery (fig)sich in Szene setzen
(Art) → (Kunst)galerie f
(underground) → Stollen m

gallery

[ˈgælərɪ] n (also art gallery) (state owned) → museo (also 000) (private) → galleria, loggia; (for spectators) → tribuna; (in theatre) → loggione m, balconata
to play to the gallery → parlare (per accattivarsi il pubblico)

gallery

(ˈgӕləri) plural ˈgalleries noun
1. a large room or building in which paintings, statues etc are on show. an art gallery.
2. an upper floor of seats in a church, theatre etc, especially (in a theatre) the top floor.
adjective
gallery seats.

gallery

مَعْرِض galerie galleri Kunstgalerie γκαλερί galería galleria galerie galerija galleria 画廊 화랑 galerie galleri galeria galeria галерея galleri ห้องแสดงภาพ galeri phòng trưng bày nghệ thuật 画廊
References in classic literature ?
The trip was like riding through a long picture gallery, full of lovely landscapes.
He walked down the gallery and across the narrow "bridges" which connected the Lebrun cottages one with the other.
They were now in a straight and long gallery, in a chasm of the rocks, where retreat without encountering the animal was impossible.
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad, the Japanese loan, the new wing to his art gallery, and an attack that morning, in his own newspaper, upon his pet trust.
There is one likeness, without which my gallery of Custom-House portraits would be strangely incomplete, but which my comparatively few opportunities for observation enable me to sketch only in the merest outline.
It was a matter of no little vanity to him on Sundays, to take his station in front of the church gallery, with a band of chosen singers; where, in his own mind, he completely carried away the palm from the parson.
Go and gaze upon all the paintings in Europe, and where will you find such a gallery of living and breathing commotion on canvas, as in that triumphal hall at Versailles; where the beholder fights his way, pell-mell, through the consecutive great battles of France; where every sword seems a flash of the Northern Lights, and the successive armed kings and Emperors dash by, like a charge of crowned centaurs?
Sir Clifford thinks of charging twopence for a peep at the whispering gallery in the spinal column; threepence to hear the echo in the hollow of his cerebellum; and sixpence for the unrivalled view from his forehead.
They crossed the railroad tracks, and then on each side of the street were the pens full of cattle; they would have stopped to look, but Jokubas hurried them on, to where there was a stairway and a raised gallery, from which everything could be seen.
Every room and gallery of the house resounded with sobs and shrieks of despair.
It was very, very lofty; so lofty that the banners depending from the arched beams and girders away up there floated in a sort of twilight; there was a stone-railed gallery at each end, high up, with musicians in the one, and women, clothed in stunning colors, in the other.
It was true; all the six tiers were filled, and remained so to the end--which suggested that it is not only balcony people who like Shakespeare in Germany, but those of the pit and gallery, too.