galley


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gal·ley

 (găl′ē)
n. pl. gal·leys
1. Nautical
a. A large, usually single-decked medieval ship of shallow draft, propelled by sails and oars and used as a merchant ship or warship in the Mediterranean.
b. An ancient Mediterranean seagoing vessel propelled by oars.
c. A large rowboat formerly used by British customs officers.
2. The kitchen of an airliner, ship, or camper.
3.
a. A long, usually metal tray, used for assembling lines of printers' type in composing proofs and pages.
b. A proof made with printer's type before page composition to allow for the detection and correction of errors.

[Middle English galei, from Old French galie, from Old Provençal or Catalan galea, from Medieval Greek, probably variant of Greek galeos, shark, perhaps from galeē, weasel.]

galley

(ˈɡælɪ)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) any of various kinds of ship propelled by oars or sails used in ancient or medieval times as a warship or as a trader
2. (Nautical Terms) the kitchen of a ship, boat, or aircraft
3. (Nautical Terms) any of various long rowing boats
4. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing
a. (in hot-metal composition) a tray open at one end for holding composed type
b. short for galley proof
[C13: from Old French galie, from Medieval Latin galea, from Greek galaia, of unknown origin; the sense development apparently is due to the association of a galley or slave ship with a ship's kitchen and hence with a hot furnace, trough, printer's tray, etc]

gal•ley

(ˈgæl i)

n., pl. -leys.
1.
a. the kitchen area of a ship, plane, or camper.
b. any small narrow kitchen.
2.
a. a seagoing vessel propelled mainly by oars, used in ancient and medieval times, sometimes with the aid of sails.
b. a long rowboat, as one used as a ship's boat by a warship or one used for dragging a seine.
3.
a. a long narrow tray, usu. of metal, for holding type that has been set.
[1250–1300; < Old French galee, galie, perhaps < Old Provençal galea < Late Greek galéa, galaía]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.galley - a large medieval vessel with a single deck propelled by sails and oars with guns at stern and prowgalley - a large medieval vessel with a single deck propelled by sails and oars with guns at stern and prow; a complement of 1,000 men; used mainly in the Mediterranean for war and trading
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation
2.galley - (classical antiquity) a crescent-shaped seagoing vessel propelled by oars
trireme - ancient Greek or Roman galley or warship having three tiers of oars on each side
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation
antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
3.galley - the kitchen area for food preparation on an airliner
airliner - a commercial airplane that carries passengers
kitchen - a room equipped for preparing meals
4.galley - the area for food preparation on a ship
cuddy - the galley or pantry of a small ship
kitchen - a room equipped for preparing meals
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight

galley

noun kitchen, kitchenette, cookhouse The bo'sun was in the ship's galley brewing coffee.
Translations
قادِس، سَفينَه شِراعِيَّهمَطْبَخ السَّفينَه
galéralodní kuchyně
galejkabys
kaleerikapyysi
hajókonyha
eldhús um borî í skipigaleiîa
galerakambuzaslaivo virtuvė
galerakambīze
galéralodná kuchyňa
gemi mutfağıkadırga

galley

[ˈgælɪ]
A. N
1. (= ship) → galera f
2. (= ship's kitchen) → cocina f, fogón m
3. (Typ) → galerada f, galera f
B. CPD galley proof N (Typ) → galerada f
galley slave Ngaleote m

galley

[ˈgæli] n
(= ship's kitchen) → coquerie f
(= ship) → galère f
(also galley proof) → placard mgalley kitchen ncuisine f en longgalley slave ngalérien m

galley

n
(Naut: = ship) → Galeere f; (= kitchen)Kombüse f
(Typ, = tray) → (Setz)schiff nt; (also galley proof)Fahne f, → Fahnenabzug m

galley

[ˈgælɪ] n (ship) → galea; (ship's kitchen) → cambusa

galley

(ˈgӕli) noun
1. in former times, a long low ship with one deck, moved by oars (and often sails).
2. a ship's kitchen.
References in classic literature ?
That is a chain of galley slaves, on the way to the galleys by force of the king's orders.
The chain of galley slaves had by this time come up, and Don Quixote in very courteous language asked those who were in custody of it to be good enough to tell him the reason or reasons for which they were conducting these people in this manner.
While we were comforting ourselves by the fire after our meal, the Jack - who was sitting in a corner, and who had a bloated pair of shoes on, which he had exhibited while we were eating our eggs and bacon, as interesting relics that he had taken a few days ago from the feet of a drowned seaman washed ashore - asked me if we had seen a four-oared galley going up with the tide?
A four-oared galley hovering about in so unusual a way as to attract this notice, was an ugly circumstance that I could not get rid of.
At each end of the yard there did indeed hang the dark figure of a man, jolting and lurching with hideous jerkings of its limbs at every plunge and swoop of the galley.
They have come in two great galleys," answered the mayor, "with two bank of oars on either side, and great store of engines of war and of men-at-arms.
The commander of the first Roman galley must have looked with an intense absorption upon the estuary of the Thames as he turned the beaked prow of his ship to the westward under the brow of the North Foreland.
A draggled muslin cap on his head and a dirty gunny-sack about his slim hips proclaimed him cook of the decidedly dirty ship's galley in which I found myself.
Go to Argus, the shipbuilder, and bid him build a galley with fifty oars.
While we were wholly engaged with these apprehensions, we discovered a Turkish ship and galley were come upon us.
Six months in the galley heat had effected some sort of a change in the thick sweet wine--branded it, I imagine.
On this deck, between the break of the poop and the steerage companion, stood the galley.