gallium


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gal·li·um

 (găl′ē-əm)
n. Symbol Ga
A rare metallic element that is liquid near room temperature, expands on solidifying, and is found as a trace element in coal, bauxite, and other minerals. It is used in semiconductor technology, as a component of various low-melting alloys, and in producing blue light-emitting diodes. Atomic number 31; atomic weight 69.72; melting point 29.78°C; boiling point 2,403°C; specific gravity 5.907; valence 2, 3. See Periodic Table.

[From Latin gallus, cock, punning translation of surname of Paul Émile Lecoq de Boisbaudran (1838-1912), French chemist and element's discoverer : French le, the + French coq, rooster.]

gallium

(ˈɡælɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a silvery metallic element that is liquid for a wide temperature range. It occurs in trace amounts in some ores and is used in high-temperature thermometers and low-melting alloys. Gallium arsenide is a semiconductor. Symbol: Ga; atomic no: 31; atomic wt: 69.723; valency: 2 or 3; relative density: 5.904; melting pt: 29.77°C; boiling pt: 2205°C
[C19: from New Latin, from Latin gallus cock, translation of French coq in the name of its discoverer, Lecoq de Boisbaudran, 19th-century French chemist]

gal•li•um

(ˈgæl i əm)

n.
a rare steel-gray metallic element used in high-temperature thermometers because of its high boiling point (1983°C) and low melting point (30°C). Symbol: Ga; at. wt.: 69.72; at. no.: 31; sp. gr.: 5.91 at 20°C.
[1870–75; < New Latin, derivative of Latin gall(us) cock (translation of French coq, from Lecoq de Boisbaudran, 19th-century French chemist) + New Latin -ium -ium2]

gal·li·um

(găl′ē-əm)
Symbol Ga A rare, silvery metallic element that is found as a trace element in coal, bauxite, and other minerals. It is liquid near room temperature and is used in thermometers and semiconductors. Atomic number 31. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gallium - a rare silvery (usually trivalent) metallic elementgallium - a rare silvery (usually trivalent) metallic element; brittle at low temperatures but liquid above room temperature; occurs in trace amounts in bauxite and zinc ores
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
bauxite - a clay-like mineral; the chief ore of aluminum; composed of aluminum oxides and aluminum hydroxides; used as an abrasive and catalyst
Translations
gallium
gallium
galio
gallium
gallium
galij
gallium
gallín
ガリウム
galis
gallium
gal
galiu
galij
gallium
galyum
gali

gallium

[ˈgælɪəm] Ngalio m

gal·li·um

n. galio, metal.

gallium

n galio
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