gallivant

(redirected from gallivanting)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to gallivanting: envisaged

gal·li·vant

also gal·a·vant (găl′ə-vănt′)
intr.v. gal·li·vant·ed, gal·li·vant·ing, gal·li·vants also gal·a·vant·ed or gal·a·vant·ing or gal·a·vants
1. To roam about in search of pleasure or amusement. See Synonyms at wander.
2. To play around amorously; flirt.

[Perhaps alteration of gallant.]

gallivant

(ˈɡælɪˌvænt) ,

galivant

or

galavant

vb
(intr) to go about in search of pleasure; gad about
[C19: perhaps whimsical modification of gallant]

gal•li•vant

or gal•a•vant

(ˈgæl əˌvænt, ˌgæl əˈvænt)
v.i.
1. to wander about, seeking pleasure.
2. to go about with members of the opposite sex.
[1815–25; perhaps alter. of gallant]

gallivant


Past participle: gallivanted
Gerund: gallivanting

Imperative
gallivant
gallivant
Present
I gallivant
you gallivant
he/she/it gallivants
we gallivant
you gallivant
they gallivant
Preterite
I gallivanted
you gallivanted
he/she/it gallivanted
we gallivanted
you gallivanted
they gallivanted
Present Continuous
I am gallivanting
you are gallivanting
he/she/it is gallivanting
we are gallivanting
you are gallivanting
they are gallivanting
Present Perfect
I have gallivanted
you have gallivanted
he/she/it has gallivanted
we have gallivanted
you have gallivanted
they have gallivanted
Past Continuous
I was gallivanting
you were gallivanting
he/she/it was gallivanting
we were gallivanting
you were gallivanting
they were gallivanting
Past Perfect
I had gallivanted
you had gallivanted
he/she/it had gallivanted
we had gallivanted
you had gallivanted
they had gallivanted
Future
I will gallivant
you will gallivant
he/she/it will gallivant
we will gallivant
you will gallivant
they will gallivant
Future Perfect
I will have gallivanted
you will have gallivanted
he/she/it will have gallivanted
we will have gallivanted
you will have gallivanted
they will have gallivanted
Future Continuous
I will be gallivanting
you will be gallivanting
he/she/it will be gallivanting
we will be gallivanting
you will be gallivanting
they will be gallivanting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gallivanting
you have been gallivanting
he/she/it has been gallivanting
we have been gallivanting
you have been gallivanting
they have been gallivanting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gallivanting
you will have been gallivanting
he/she/it will have been gallivanting
we will have been gallivanting
you will have been gallivanting
they will have been gallivanting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gallivanting
you had been gallivanting
he/she/it had been gallivanting
we had been gallivanting
you had been gallivanting
they had been gallivanting
Conditional
I would gallivant
you would gallivant
he/she/it would gallivant
we would gallivant
you would gallivant
they would gallivant
Past Conditional
I would have gallivanted
you would have gallivanted
he/she/it would have gallivanted
we would have gallivanted
you would have gallivanted
they would have gallivanted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.gallivant - wander aimlessly in search of pleasure
rove, stray, roam, vagabond, wander, swan, ramble, range, drift, tramp, cast, roll - move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment; "The gypsies roamed the woods"; "roving vagabonds"; "the wandering Jew"; "The cattle roam across the prairie"; "the laborers drift from one town to the next"; "They rolled from town to town"

gallivant

verb gad about, wander, roam, run around, ramble, rove, range, go walkabout (Austral.), stravaig (Scot. & Northern English dialect) She shouldn't be gallivanting around filling her head with nonsense.

gallivant

verb
To move about at random, especially over a wide area:
Translations

gallivant

[ˈgælɪvænt] vi (= gad) to go gallivanting → se balader
to gallivant around → se balader

gallivant

visich amüsieren; to gallivant about or aroundsich herumtreiben, → herumstromern (pej); to gallivant offlosziehen (inf); I was out gallivanting last nightich war gestern Abend bummeln or auf Achse (inf)

gallivant

[ˈgælɪˌvænt] viandare in giro a divertirsi
References in classic literature ?
It won't be dull with me popping; in every day to tell you how Beth is, and take you out gallivanting.
You know you are forbidden to go gallivanting round with those chaps, and that 's the reason you 're in a pucker now.
So the sooner he goes, the better for him, and the sooner I go, the better for me, I am sure, or else I shall have my maid gallivanting with somebody who may rob the house--though what there is to take away, besides tables and chairs, I don't know, except the miniatures: and he is a clever thief who can dispose of them to any great advantage, for I can't, I know, and that's the honest truth.
I was indeed your uncle's man of business; but while you (imberbis juvenis custode remoto) were gallivanting in the west, a good deal of water has run under the bridges; and if your ears did not sing, it was not for lack of being talked about.
So keep your eyes open, Billy, while you're gallivanting over the valley.
You can't be a gallivanting dodger,' said Fledgeby.
20pm Last week, the gallivanting Gallifreyan and his sidekick arrived in Britain during Viking times, where they helped save villagers from destruction and met a mysterious young woman who captivated the Doctor.
Not only has she been dealing with all the baby drama, but her so-called loving fiance has been off gallivanting with Stacey.
DOCUMENTARY Christine Bleakley has been gallivanting her way around Ireland for our amusement and now she hits the final leg of her journey with a trip in the country's only cable car.
Well, Peter Capaldi is still the gallivanting Gallifreyan, Jenna Coleman is back as Clara and Nick Frost makes a guest appearance as the one n is b es a guest a as th Strictly Come Dancing Christmas Special BBC1, 5pm Tinsel, tutus and terrific dancing - they're all in store for viewers as some familiar faces take to the dance floor once last time.
While a blanket ban on such activities might inconvenience a few people and businesses, gallivanting around the more elevated portions of our countryside is no more necessary than drinking and driving and its abolition would save many more lives.
Clara thinks this arrangement suits her just fine - after all, what could be better than gallivanting with the Gallifreyan one minute, and then settling down to watch telly with her new boyfriend the next?