galvanism


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gal·va·nism

 (găl′və-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. Direct-current electricity, especially when produced chemically. Also called voltaism.
2. Therapeutic application of direct-current electricity, especially the electric stimulation of nerves and muscle.

[After Luigi Galvani.]

galvanism

(ˈɡælvəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (General Physics) obsolete electricity, esp when produced by chemical means as in a cell or battery
2. (Medicine) med treatment involving the application of electric currents to tissues
[C18: via French from Italian galvanismo, after Luigi Galvani]

gal•va•nism

(ˈgæl vəˌnɪz əm)

n.
1. electricity, esp. as produced by chemical action.
2. the therapeutic application of electricity to the body.
[1790–1800; < French galvanisme]

galvanism

a direct electrical current, especially one produced by chemical action. — galvanic, adj.
See also: Physics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.galvanism - electricity produced by chemical action
electricity - a physical phenomenon associated with stationary or moving electrons and protons
2.galvanism - the therapeutic application of electricity to the body (as in the treatment of various forms of paralysis)
therapy - (medicine) the act of caring for someone (as by medication or remedial training etc.); "the quarterback is undergoing treatment for a knee injury"; "he tried every treatment the doctors suggested"; "heat therapy gave the best relief"
ECT, electroconvulsive therapy, electroshock, electroshock therapy - the administration of a strong electric current that passes through the brain to induce convulsions and coma
Translations

galvanism

[ˈgælvənɪzəm] Ngalvanismo m

galvanism

nGalvanismus m

gal·va·nism

n. galvanismo, uso terapéutico de corriente eléctrica directa.
References in classic literature ?
Lydgate's only relaxation now was to go and look at this woman, just as he might have thrown himself under the breath of the sweet south on a bank of violets for a while, without prejudice to his galvanism, to which he would presently return.
Three days afterwards Lydgate was at his galvanism again in his Paris chambers, believing that illusions were at an end for him.
Any part, being subjected to a slight shock of galvanism, became almost black: a similar effect, but in a less degree, was produced by scratching the skin with a needle.
POLARITY, or action and reaction, we meet in every part of nature; in darkness and light; in heat and cold; in the ebb and flow of waters; in male and female; in the inspiration and expiration of plants and animals; in the equation of quantity and quality in the fluids of the animal body; in the systole and diastole of the heart; in the undulations of fluids, and of sound; in the centrifugal and centripetal gravity; in electricity, galvanism, and chemical affinity.
On this occasion a man of great research in natural philosophy was with us, and excited by this catastrophe, he entered on the explanation of a theory which he had formed on the subject of electricity and galvanism, which was at once new and astonishing to me.
In other words, her fictional extrapolations about galvanism and the spark of life rested on firm scientific foundations.
She and a group of literary friends spent the strangely stormy summer discussing both the old and the new: traditional Germanic ghost stories and recent experiments in galvanism (an Italian anatomist Galvani had applied electricity to a dead frog, producing movement).
He also had the highly unusual gift of putting the science in its historical and social context: he spoke of 'the history of galvanism, detailed the successive discoveries', and its possible future.