gamekeeper


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game·keep·er

 (gām′kē′pər)
n.
One employed to protect and maintain game birds and other game animals, especially on an estate or game preserve.

gamekeeper

(ˈɡeɪmˌkiːpə)
n
a person employed to take care of game and wildlife, as on an estate
ˈgameˌkeeping n

game•keep•er

(ˈgeɪmˌki pər)

n.
a person employed, as on an estate or game preserve, to prevent poaching and provide for the conservation of game.
[1660–70]
game′keep`ing, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gamekeeper - a person employed to take care of game and wildlifegamekeeper - a person employed to take care of game and wildlife
custodian, keeper, steward - one having charge of buildings or grounds or animals
warrener - maintains a rabbit warren
Translations
خَفير الصَّيْد
hajný
jagtbetjent
veiîivörîur
hájnik
avlak bekçisi

gamekeeper

[ˈgeɪmˌkiːpəʳ] Nguardabosques mf inv, guardabosque mf

gamekeeper

[ˈgeɪmkiːpər] ngarde-chasse m

gamekeeper

[ˈgeɪmˌkiːpəʳ] nguardacaccia m inv

game

(geim) noun
1. an enjoyable activity, which eg children play. a game of pretending.
2. a competitive form of activity, with rules. Football, tennis and chess are games.
3. a match or part of a match. a game of tennis; winning (by) three games to one.
4. (the flesh of) certain birds and animals which are killed for sport. He's very fond of game; (also adjective) a game bird.
adjective
brave; willing; ready. a game old guy; game for anything.
ˈgamely adverb
courageously.
games noun plural
an athletic competition, sometimes with other sports. the Olympic Games.
ˈgamekeeper noun
a person who looks after game.
game point
a winning point.
game reserve
an area of land set aside for the protection of animals.
game warden
a person who looks after a game reserve or, in the United States, game.
the game is up
the plan or trick has failed or has been found out.
References in classic literature ?
A word or two concerning a squire, and more relating to a gamekeeper and a schoolmaster.
This friend was the gamekeeper, a fellow of a loose kind of disposition, and who was thought not to entertain much stricter notions concerning the difference of
To say the truth, some of that atrocious wickedness in Jones, of which we have just mentioned three examples, might perhaps be derived from the encouragement he had received from this fellow, who, in two or three instances, had been what the law calls an accessary after the fact: for the whole duck, and great part of the apples, were converted to the use of the gamekeeper and his family; though, as Jones alone was discovered, the poor lad bore not only the whole smart, but the whole blame; both which fell again to his lot on the following occasion.
Trundle, with Sam Weller on the box beside the driver, pulled up by a gate at the roadside, before which stood a tall, raw-boned gamekeeper, and a half-booted, leather-legginged boy, each bearing a bag of capacious dimensions, and accompanied by a brace of pointers.
The tall gamekeeper replied in the affirmative, and looked with some surprise from Mr.
The doctor had to go to London for a physician to take charge of his practice; the squire was hard at work at Bristol; and I lived on at the hall under the charge of old Redruth, the gamekeeper, almost a prisoner, but full of sea-dreams and the most charming anticipations of strange islands and adventures.
Obeying this order, we found, or rather I found--for the gamekeeper was a poor hand at reading anything but print--the following important news:
Take care of it,' said he, 'and don't let it go near the rabbit-warren, for the gamekeeper swears he'll shoot it if he sees it there again: he would have done so to-day, if I had not been in time to stop him.
I'm feared o' th' gamekeepers,' said she: 'that's all
If they did get the dog of a strange poacher, no gamekeeper or constable could identify 'm by the dog-- mum was the word.
Bertram, first in a letter to the gamekeeper and then in a letter to Edmund; and by the end of August he arrived himself, to be gay, agreeable, and gallant again as occasion served, or Miss Crawford demanded; to tell of races and Weymouth, and parties and friends, to which she might have listened six weeks before with some interest, and altogether to give her the fullest conviction, by the power of actual comparison, of her preferring his younger brother.
The roulette-ball was not even spinning, and the gamekeeper stood by the roaring, red-hot stove, talking with the young, dark-eyed woman, comely of face and figure, who was known from Juneau to Fort Yukon as the Virgin.