gamesome


Also found in: Legal.

game·some

 (gām′səm)
adj.
Frolicsome; playful.

game′some·ly adv.
game′some·ness n.

gamesome

(ˈɡeɪmsəm)
adj
full of merriment; sportive
ˈgamesomely adv
ˈgamesomeness n
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References in classic literature ?
In their gamesome but still serious way, one whispers to the other --"Jack, he's robbed a widow;" or,"Joe, do you mark him; he's a bigamist;" or,"Harry lad, I guess he's the adulterer that broke jail in old Gomorrah, or belike, one of the missing murderers from Sodom.
Again and again to such gamesome talk, the dexterous dart is repeated, the spear returning to its master like a greyhound held in skilful leash.
Once he attempted it by starvation; but, while the wretched man was on the point of famishing, the monster seemed to feed upon his heart, and to thrive and wax gamesome, as if it were his sweetest and most congenial diet.
Moreover, I tell thee thy speech is witty and gamesome as any I ever heard in all my life.
The frustration would have been less exasperating if it had been less gamesome and boyish: a serious assault of which the newspaper reporter "can aver that it endangered the learned gentleman's ribs," or can respectfully bear witness to "the soles of that gentleman's boots having been visible above the railing," has perhaps more consolations attached to it.
Gamesome was sixth in the Wokingham before finishing a length behind Huntsmans Close in another important handicap at Windsor.
GAMESOME should also be thereabouts, so have another 2pts ew at 25-1 with Betfred who also go FIVE places.
Channel 4 cameras will also be at Ascot today and I'm rowing in with GAMESOME (2.
gorgeous green-gowned gals, giddily gamesome, glad-warbling, granting
00 1 GAMESOME M Barzalona (6-1) 2 Speedfiend P Cosgrave (5-1) 3 Makhfar William Buick (1-2 Fav) 10 ran 3 7 O Stevens Tote: win PS10.
He is the most gamesome and light-hearted of all the whales, making more gay foam and white water generally than any other of them.
Byatt, Peter Wolfe, Frank Baldanza, Rubin Rabinovitz); a second phase (1980s) that rejected this early orthodoxy (Richard Todd, Guy Backus, Lorna Sage) and led to a new orthodoxy, Peter Conradi's view of Murdoch as a moral psychologist; and a third phase (1987-95) that read her in terms of postmodernism, variously focusing on issues such as gender, gamesome self-reflexivity, dialogicism, and the carnivalesque (Elizabeth Dipple, Deborah Johnson, and Heusel herself).