gamma


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gam·ma

 (găm′ə)
n.
1. The third letter of the Greek alphabet. See Table at alphabet.
2. The third item in a series or system of classification.
3. A unit of magnetic intensity equal to one hundred thousandth (10-5) of an oersted.
4. A unit of mass equal to one millionth (10-6) of a gram.
adj. Chemistry
1. Being in the third position relative to a designated carbon atom in an organic molecule at which an atom or a group may be substituted.
2. Referring to the third of a group of isomers, or molecules of similar origin or properties, determined arbitrarily by those who discover or classify them. Used in combination.

[Middle English, from Greek, of Phoenician origin; see gml in Semitic roots.]

gamma

(ˈɡæmə)
n
1. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) the third letter in the Greek alphabet (Γ, γ), a consonant, transliterated as g. When double, it is transcribed and pronounced as ng
2. (Education) the third highest grade or mark, as in an examination
3. (Units) a unit of magnetic field strength equal to 10–5 oersted. 1 gamma is equivalent to 0.795 775 × 10–3 ampere per metre
4. (Photography) photog television the numerical value of the slope of the characteristic curve of a photographic emulsion or television camera; a measure of the contrast reproduced in a photographic or television image
5. (Electronics) photog television the numerical value of the slope of the characteristic curve of a photographic emulsion or television camera; a measure of the contrast reproduced in a photographic or television image
6. (Atomic Physics) involving or relating to photons of very high energy: a gamma detector.
7. (Chemistry) relating to one of two or more allotropes or crystal structures of a solid: gamma iron.
8. (Chemistry) relating to one of two or more isomeric forms of a chemical compound, esp one in which a group is attached to the carbon atom next but one to the atom to which the principal group is attached
[C14: from Greek; related to Hebrew gīmel third letter of the Hebrew alphabet (probably: camel)]

Gamma

(ˈɡæmə)
n
(Astronomy) (foll by the genitive case of a specified constellation) the third brightest star in a constellation: Gamma Leonis.

gam•ma

(ˈgæm ə)

n., pl. -mas.
1. the third letter of the Greek alphabet (Ɣ, γ).
2. the third in a series of items.
3. (cap.) a star that is usu. the third brightest of a constellation.
4. a unit of weight equal to one microgram.
5. a unit of magnetic field strength, equal to 10−5 gauss.
6. a measure of the degree of development of a photographic negative or print.
[< Greek gámma]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gamma - the 3rd letter of the Greek alphabetgamma - the 3rd letter of the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet - the alphabet used by ancient Greeks
alphabetic character, letter of the alphabet, letter - the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech; "his grandmother taught him his letters"
2.gamma - a unit of magnetic field strength equal to one-hundred-thousandth of an oersted
field strength unit - an electromagnetic unit of magnetic intensity
oersted - the magnetic field strength 1 cm from a unit magnetic pole
3.gamma - Portuguese navigator who led an expedition around the Cape of Good Hope in 1497Gamma - Portuguese navigator who led an expedition around the Cape of Good Hope in 1497; he sighted and named Natal on Christmas Day before crossing the Indian Ocean (1469-1524)
Translations
أشِعَّة جَمّا
gamma
záření gama
gamma
gammagammafunktio
gamma
gamma
gammageislar
gama spinduliai
gamma stari
gamma
gama ışınları

gamma

[ˈgæmə]
A. Ngamma f
B. CPD gamma radiation Nradiación f gamma
gamma ray Nrayo m gamma

gamma

[ˈgæmə] ngamma mgamma rays nplrayons mpl gamma

gamma

:
gamma radiation
gamma ray
nGammastrahl m

gamma

[ˈgæmə] ngamma m or f

gamma

(ˈgӕmə) : gamma rays
a powerful form of radiation.

gamma

n gamma; — knife bisturí de rayos gamma
References in classic literature ?
The word {sigma iota gamma upsilon nu omicron nu}, 'lance,' is to the Cyprians a current term but to us a strange one.
epsilon rho nu upsilon gamma epsilon sigma}, 'sprouters,' for {kappa epsilon rho alpha tau alpha}, 'horns,' and {alpha rho eta tau eta rho},
omicron psi}, as in {mu iota alpha / gamma iota nu epsilon tau alpha iota / alpha mu phi omicron tau episilon rho omega nu / omicron psi}.
The star you refer to is Gamma, of the constellation Cassiopeia.
The Gamma Knife beams gamma radiation to dissolve tumors and lesions and other disorders in inaccessible areas of the brain.
14 pulse was also detected by the United States' Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite.
A videotape that records the experiences of Gamma Mu, members while on two trips together, obtained exclusively by The Advocate, reveals the surprising answers: Gamma Mu is about dapper men donning big hats and acting silly at a party.
A novel gamma 2-herpesvirus of the Rhadinovirns 2 lineage in chimpanzees.
Putative activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma impairs androgen and enhances progesterone biosynthesis in primary cultures of porcine theca ceils.
But when antimatter comes into contact with ordinary matter, the two kinds of matter instantly annihilate each other, producing gamma rays, which can be detected by instruments outside Earth's shielding atmosphere.
Gamma's remarkable accomplishments in 2006 are a testament to our unparalleled innovation in the application data management industry," said Allan Peters, CEO, Gamma Enterprise Technologies.
Scientists using the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's orbiting Compton Gamma Ray Observatory said the 150-minute flare turned the quasar known as PKS 1622-297 into the brightest gamma-ray source in the sky for several days last summer.