gamma

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Related to gammas: games, Gamas

gam·ma

 (găm′ə)
n.
1. The third letter of the Greek alphabet. See Table at alphabet.
2. The third item in a series or system of classification.
3. A unit of magnetic intensity equal to one hundred thousandth (10-5) of an oersted.
4. A unit of mass equal to one millionth (10-6) of a gram.
adj. Chemistry
1. Being in the third position relative to a designated carbon atom in an organic molecule at which an atom or a group may be substituted.
2. Referring to the third of a group of isomers, or molecules of similar origin or properties, determined arbitrarily by those who discover or classify them. Used in combination.

[Middle English, from Greek, of Phoenician origin; see gml in Semitic roots.]

gamma

(ˈɡæmə)
n
1. (Letters of the Alphabet (Foreign)) the third letter in the Greek alphabet (Γ, γ), a consonant, transliterated as g. When double, it is transcribed and pronounced as ng
2. (Education) the third highest grade or mark, as in an examination
3. (Units) a unit of magnetic field strength equal to 10–5 oersted. 1 gamma is equivalent to 0.795 775 × 10–3 ampere per metre
4. (Photography) photog television the numerical value of the slope of the characteristic curve of a photographic emulsion or television camera; a measure of the contrast reproduced in a photographic or television image
5. (Electronics) photog television the numerical value of the slope of the characteristic curve of a photographic emulsion or television camera; a measure of the contrast reproduced in a photographic or television image
6. (Atomic Physics) involving or relating to photons of very high energy: a gamma detector.
7. (Chemistry) relating to one of two or more allotropes or crystal structures of a solid: gamma iron.
8. (Chemistry) relating to one of two or more isomeric forms of a chemical compound, esp one in which a group is attached to the carbon atom next but one to the atom to which the principal group is attached
[C14: from Greek; related to Hebrew gīmel third letter of the Hebrew alphabet (probably: camel)]

Gamma

(ˈɡæmə)
n
(Astronomy) (foll by the genitive case of a specified constellation) the third brightest star in a constellation: Gamma Leonis.

gam•ma

(ˈgæm ə)

n., pl. -mas.
1. the third letter of the Greek alphabet (Ɣ, γ).
2. the third in a series of items.
3. (cap.) a star that is usu. the third brightest of a constellation.
4. a unit of weight equal to one microgram.
5. a unit of magnetic field strength, equal to 10−5 gauss.
6. a measure of the degree of development of a photographic negative or print.
[< Greek gámma]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gamma - the 3rd letter of the Greek alphabetgamma - the 3rd letter of the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet - the alphabet used by ancient Greeks
alphabetic character, letter of the alphabet, letter - the conventional characters of the alphabet used to represent speech; "his grandmother taught him his letters"
2.gamma - a unit of magnetic field strength equal to one-hundred-thousandth of an oersted
field strength unit - an electromagnetic unit of magnetic intensity
oersted - the magnetic field strength 1 cm from a unit magnetic pole
3.gamma - Portuguese navigator who led an expedition around the Cape of Good Hope in 1497Gamma - Portuguese navigator who led an expedition around the Cape of Good Hope in 1497; he sighted and named Natal on Christmas Day before crossing the Indian Ocean (1469-1524)
Translations
أشِعَّة جَمّا
gamma
záření gama
gamma
gammagammafunktio
gamma
gamma
gammageislar
gama spinduliai
gamma stari
gamma
gama ışınları

gamma

[ˈgæmə]
A. Ngamma f
B. CPD gamma radiation Nradiación f gamma
gamma ray Nrayo m gamma

gamma

[ˈgæmə] ngamma mgamma rays nplrayons mpl gamma

gamma

:
gamma radiation
gamma ray
nGammastrahl m

gamma

[ˈgæmə] ngamma m or f

gamma

(ˈgӕmə) : gamma rays
a powerful form of radiation.

gamma

n gamma; — knife bisturí de rayos gamma
References in periodicals archive ?
They found that the intensity of the radio waves and gammas peaked and diminished in sync, providing new evidence that high-energy electrons generate both types of radiation.
But the spectrum of radiation released during and after a flare - running the gamut from radio waves to high-energy gamma rays - has recently come into sharper focus.
and his colleagues decided to examine several of the sources with a telescope that could infer the presence of gammas about 1,000 times more energetic.
Because gamma rays can't survive in Earth's atmosphere, only satellites such as the GRO can detect them directly, But the small detectors aboard such craft have difficulty recording the relatively low abundance of very energetic gammas, Weekes notes.
GRO had previously identified eight quasars with similarly high-intensity gammas (SN: 1/25/92, p.
If some quasars beamed that much radiation toward Earth, they likely radiated a total of 10 to 100 times that amount in all directions -- and that was impossible, since the concentration of gammas needed to produce such intense radiation would cause the gammas to collide and annihilate each other, leaving pairs of oppositely charged subatomic particles in the stead.
Like its two siblings, it also radiates radio waves and X-rays, but gammas make up most of its pulsed energy.
Micheal adds that Circinus' gamma-ray flashes last longer than its radio-wave pulses - an observation that appears to support the theory that gammas originate higher above the pulsar's poles, where the magnetic field is whether, than do radio waves.
Goodman says if his theory about the origin of these photons proves correct, the number of gammas above 100,000 GeV should begin to fall, since Compton scattering cannot produce photons at these higher energies.
Coronary artery restenosis after balloon angioplasty remains a major unmet clinical need and Implant Sciences is focusing its efforts on commercializing a short-duration, radioactive temporary catheter and permanently implanted radioactive stents using "soft gamma emitting radiation.
Astrophysicists have expected that supernovas would be sources of what they call ultrahigh-energy gamma rays.