gardens


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gar·den

 (gär′dn)
n.
1.
a. A plot of land used for the cultivation of flowers, vegetables, herbs, or fruit.
b. An arrangement of living material that is cultivated for food, as a fungus garden maintained by ants.
2. often gardens Grounds laid out with flowers, trees, and ornamental shrubs and used for recreation or display: public gardens; a botanical garden.
3. A yard or lawn.
4. A fertile, well-cultivated region.
5.
a. An open-air establishment where refreshments are served.
b. A large public auditorium or arena.
v. gar·dened, gar·den·ing, gar·dens
v.tr.
1. To cultivate (a plot of ground) as a garden.
2. To furnish with a garden.
v.intr.
1. To plant or tend a garden.
2. To work as a gardener.
adj.
1. Of, suitable to, or used in a garden: garden tools; garden vegetables.
2. Provided with open areas and greenery: a garden community.
3. Garden-variety.
Idiom:
lead/take down the garden path
To mislead or deceive (another).

[Middle English gardin, from Old North French, from gart, of Germanic origin; see gher- in Indo-European roots.]

gardens

(ˈɡɑːdənz)
pl n
1. (Horticulture) an area of land used for the cultivation of ornamental plants, etc, that is open to the public, sometimes part of a park
2. (Horticulture) an area of land surrounding a large house, usually planted with grass, trees, flowerbeds, etc
Translations
حَدائِق، جَنائِن
sadyzahrada
havehaveanlæg
lystigarîur

garden

(ˈgaːdn) noun
a piece of ground on which flowers, vegetables etc are grown. a small garden at the front of the house; (also adjective) a garden slug.
verb
to work in a garden, usually as a hobby. The old lady does not garden much.
ˈgardener noun
a person who works in, and looks after, a garden.
ˈgardening noun
the work of looking after a garden. Gardening is his favourite hobby; (also adjective) gardening clothes/tools.
ˈgardens noun singular or plural
a park, especially one where animals are kept or special trees or flowers are grown. zoological/botanical gardens.
garden party
a large (usually formal) party, held in the garden of a house etc.
References in classic literature ?
Both stood in a suburb of the city, which was still countrylike, with groves and lawns, large gardens, and quiet streets.
In gardens back of houses in Winesburg dry shriveled potato vines lay sprawling on the ground.
There were none of the signs of spring for which I used to watch in Virginia, no budding woods or blooming gardens.
Further away still, vegetable gardens abounded, with frequent small plantations of orange or lemon trees intervening.
Yet, in spite of this, nowhere in all America will you find more patrician-like houses; parks and gardens more opulent, than in New Bedford.
That for six thousand years --and no one knows how many millions of ages before --the great whales should have been spouting all over the sea, and sprinkling and mistifying the gardens of the deep, as with so many sprinkling or mistifying pots; and that for some centuries back, thousands of hunters should have been close by the fountain of the whale, watching these sprinklings and spoutings --that all this should be, and yet, that down to this blessed minute (fifteen and a quarter minutes past one o'clock P.
It was entered by a large iron gate, at which stood the first lodge, and then you trotted along on a smooth road between clumps of large old trees; then another lodge and another gate, which brought you to the house and the gardens.
Clare's villa was an East Indian cottage, surrounded by light verandahs of bamboo-work, and opening on all sides into gardens and pleasure-grounds.
The island of Atlantis, and the islands and gardens of the Hesperides, a sort of terrestrial paradise, appear to have been the Great West of the ancients, enveloped in mystery and poetry.
They walked about the streets and the wooded hills, they drove in cabs, they boated on the river, they sipped beer and coffee, afternoons, in the Schloss gardens.
The houses had little gardens around them, but they didn't seem to raise hardly anything in them but jimpson-weeds, and sunflowers, and ash piles, and old curled-up boots and shoes, and pieces of bottles, and rags, and played-out tinware.
Carter's cows, trod the short grass of the pasture, with its well-worn path running through gardens of buttercups and white- weed, and groves of ivory leaves and sweet fern.