garnishing


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gar·nish

 (gär′nĭsh)
tr.v. gar·nished, gar·nish·ing, gar·nish·es
1.
a. To enhance in appearance by adding decorative touches; embellish: a coat that was garnished with a fur collar.
b. To decorate (prepared food or drink) with small colorful or savory items: garnished the potatoes with parsley.
2. Law
a. To seize (property such as wages) by garnishment.
b. To serve (someone) with papers announcing the garnishment of that person's property in order to satisfy a debt.
n.
An ornamentation or embellishment, especially one added to a prepared food or drink for decoration or added flavor.

[Middle English garnishen, from Old French garnir, garniss-, of Germanic origin; see wer-4 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

garnishing

(ˈɡɑːnɪʃɪŋ)
n
(Cookery) food that is added to a plate for decoration

garnishing

In surveillance, natural or artificial material applied to an object to achieve or assist camouflage.
Translations

garnishing

[ˈgɑːnɪʃɪŋ] N (Culin) → aderezo m, adorno m

garnishing

n (Cook) → Garnierung f; (= act also)Garnieren nt; (fig, of style, story etc) → Ausschmückung f
References in classic literature ?
As he persisted in garnishing the, word with an additional syllable, I compromised the matter with him at the word 'Tommo'; and by that name I went during the entire period of my stay in the valley.
Next, I would have a pretty pullet, fairly boiled, with tender pigeons' eggs, cunningly sliced, garnishing the platter around.
The sharp features and white hair appearing alone, above the parapet, looked like a severed head garnishing the wall.
Where, then, lies the difference between the food of the nobleman and the porter, if both are at dinner on the same ox or calf, but in the seasoning, the dressing, the garnishing, and the setting forth?