garret


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gar·ret

 (găr′ĭt)
n.
A room or set of rooms immediately under the roof of a building; an attic.

[Middle English, from Old French garite, watchtower, from garir, to defend, of Germanic origin; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

garret

(ˈɡærɪt)
n
(Architecture) another word for attic1
[C14: from Old French garite watchtower, from garir to protect, of Germanic origin; see wary]

gar•ret

(ˈgær ɪt)

n.
an attic, usu. a small, cramped one.
[1300–50; Middle English garite watchtower < Old French garite, guerite watchtower, derivative of garir, guarir to defend, protect; see garrison]
gar′ret•ed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.garret - floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roofgarret - floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roof; often used for storage
cockloft - a small loft or garret
storey, floor, story, level - a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale; "what level is the office on?"
hayloft, mow, haymow - a loft in a barn where hay is stored
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"

garret

noun attic, loft a tortured artist living in a garret in Paris
Translations
podkrovípodkrovní místnost
kvist
potkrovlje
manzárdmanzárdszobapadlásszoba
háaloftháaloft, risris
bēniņijumtistaba
podkrovie
tavanarası odası

garret

[ˈgærɪt] N (= attic room) → desván m, altillo m (LAm)

garret

[ˈgærɪt] nmansarde f

garret

n (= attic room)Mansarde f, → Dachkammer f; (= attic)Dachboden m

garret

[ˈgærət] nsoffitta, mansarda

garret

(ˈgӕrət) noun
a usually small and sometimes dark room just under the roof of a house. He was poor and lived in a garret.
References in classic literature ?
It lets in the wind and rain, and the Snow, too, in the garret and upper chambers, in winter-time, but it never lets in the sunshine.
They were planning to be married in the spring, and have the garret of the house fixed up, and live there.
She made me sleep in her room; and I had to put it away off in a little kind o' garret, and thar it cried itself to death, one night.
And when time was, his host brought him into a fair garret over the gate to his bed.
WELL, when they was all gone the king he asks Mary Jane how they was off for spare rooms, and she said she had one spare room, which would do for Uncle William, and she'd give her own room to Uncle Harvey, which was a little bigger, and she would turn into the room with her sisters and sleep on a cot; and up garret was a little cubby, with a pallet in it.
There was a garret above, pierced with a scuttle over his head; and down through this scuttle came a cat, suspended around the haunches by a string; she had a rag tied about her head and jaws to keep her from mewing; as she slowly descended she curved upward and clawed at the string, she swung downward and clawed at the intangible air.
These parlors are both too small for such parties of our friends as I hope to see often collected here; and I have some thoughts of throwing the passage into one of them with perhaps a part of the other, and so leave the remainder of that other for an entrance; this, with a new drawing room which may be easily added, and a bed-chamber and garret above, will make it a very snug little cottage.
Fairfax stayed behind a moment to fasten the trap-door; I, by drift of groping, found the outlet from the attic, and proceeded to descend the narrow garret staircase.
We were both of us nodding ere any one invaded our retreat, and then it was Joseph, shuffling down a wooden ladder that vanished in the roof, through a trap: the ascent to his garret, I suppose.
No restless footsteps pattered on the stairs; no nimble tongue was heard chattering here, there, and everywhere, from the garret to the kitchen -the house seemed hardly like itself, with the one ever-disturbing element in the family serenity suddenly withdrawn from it.
There was yet an upper staircase, of a steeper inclination and of contracted dimensions, to be ascended, before the garret story was reached.
The garret windows and tops of houses were so crowded with spectators, that I thought in all my travels I had not seen a more populous place.