garret


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gar·ret

 (găr′ĭt)
n.
A room or set of rooms immediately under the roof of a building; an attic.

[Middle English, from Old French garite, watchtower, from garir, to defend, of Germanic origin; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]

garret

(ˈɡærɪt)
n
(Architecture) another word for attic1
[C14: from Old French garite watchtower, from garir to protect, of Germanic origin; see wary]

gar•ret

(ˈgær ɪt)

n.
an attic, usu. a small, cramped one.
[1300–50; Middle English garite watchtower < Old French garite, guerite watchtower, derivative of garir, guarir to defend, protect; see garrison]
gar′ret•ed, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.garret - floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roofgarret - floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roof; often used for storage
cockloft - a small loft or garret
storey, floor, story, level - a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale; "what level is the office on?"
hayloft, mow, haymow - a loft in a barn where hay is stored
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"

garret

noun attic, loft a tortured artist living in a garret in Paris
Translations
podkrovípodkrovní místnost
kvist
potkrovlje
manzárdmanzárdszobapadlásszoba
háaloftháaloft, risris
bēniņijumtistaba
podkrovie
tavanarası odası

garret

[ˈgærɪt] N (= attic room) → desván m, altillo m (LAm)

garret

[ˈgærɪt] nmansarde f

garret

n (= attic room)Mansarde f, → Dachkammer f; (= attic)Dachboden m

garret

[ˈgærət] nsoffitta, mansarda

garret

(ˈgӕrət) noun
a usually small and sometimes dark room just under the roof of a house. He was poor and lived in a garret.
References in classic literature ?
The garret of the house that Legree occupied, like most other garrets, was a great, desolate space, dusty, hung with cobwebs, and littered with cast-off lumber.
Thanks be, I'm done with geometry, learning or teaching it," said Anne Shirley, a trifle vindictively, as she thumped a somewhat battered volume of Euclid into a big chest of books, banged the lid in triumph, and sat down upon it, looking at Diana Wright across the Green Gables garret, with gray eyes that were like a morning sky.
These parlors are both too small for such parties of our friends as I hope to see often collected here; and I have some thoughts of throwing the passage into one of them with perhaps a part of the other, and so leave the remainder of that other for an entrance; this, with a new drawing room which may be easily added, and a bed-chamber and garret above, will make it a very snug little cottage.
At ten years' purchase, my dear Raoul; a superb affair, I bought the house for thirty thousand livres; it has a garden which opens to the Rue de la Mortillerie; the cabaret lets for a thousand livres, with the first story; the garret, or second floor, for five hundred livres.
Ever since the habitations of men were reared two stories high has the garret been the nursery of genius.
I did write them - in the garret - but they by no means helped her to get on with her work, for when I finished a chapter I bounded downstairs to read it to her, and so short were the chapters, so ready was the pen, that I was back with new manuscript before another clout had been added to the rug.
He therefore ordered it to be put away in the garret.
No further noises occurring to frighten him he soon reached the door to Til's house and inserting the key crept noiselessly to the garret room which he had rented from his ill-favored hostess.
To-morrow morning I will begin with the garret, nor desist till I have torn the house down
Luigi was now in the habit of waiting till his wife was asleep, and then going up to his garret to write.
He mounted the steps, and, seizing a rafter with either hand, he swung himself up into the garret.
So Becky bowed Jos out of her little garret with as much grace as if it was a palace of which she did the honours; and that heavy gentleman having disappeared down the stairs, Max and Fritz came out of their hole, pipe in mouth, and she amused herself by mimicking Jos to them as she munched her cold bread and sausage and took draughts of her favourite brandy-and-water.