gate


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gate 1

 (gāt)
n.
1. A structure that can be swung, drawn, or lowered to block an entrance or a passageway.
2.
a. An opening in a wall or fence for entrance or exit.
b. The structure surrounding such an opening, such as the monumental or fortified entrance to a palace or walled city.
3.
a. A means of access: the gate to riches.
b. A passageway, as in an airport terminal, through which passengers proceed when boarding or leaving an airplane.
4. A mountain pass.
5. The total paid attendance or admission receipts at a public event: a good gate at the football game.
6. A device for controlling the passage of water or gas through a dam or conduit.
7. The channel through which molten metal flows into a shaped cavity of a mold.
8. Sports A passage between two upright poles through which a skier must go in a slalom race.
9. A logic gate.
tr.v. gat·ed, gat·ing, gates
1. Chiefly British To confine (a student) to the grounds of a college as punishment.
2. Electronics To select part of (a wave) for transmission, reception, or processing by magnitude or time interval.
3. To furnish with a gate: "The entrance to the rear lawn was also gated" (Dean Koontz).
Idioms:
get the gate Slang
To be dismissed or rejected.
give (someone) the gate Slang
1. To discharge from a job.
2. To reject or jilt.

[Middle English, from Old English geat.]

gate 2

 (gāt)
n. Archaic
1. A path or way.
2. A particular way of acting or doing; manner.

[Middle English, from Old Norse gata; see ghē- in Indo-European roots.]

gate

(ɡeɪt)
n
1. (Building) a movable barrier, usually hinged, for closing an opening in a wall, fence, etc
2. an opening to allow passage into or out of an enclosed place
3. any means of entrance or access
4. (Physical Geography) a mountain pass or gap, esp one providing entry into another country or region
5.
a. the number of people admitted to a sporting event or entertainment
b. the total entrance money received from them
6. (Aeronautics) (in a large airport) any of the numbered exits leading to the airfield or aircraft: passengers for Paris should proceed to gate 14.
7. (Horse Racing) horse racing short for starting gate
8. (Electronics) electronics
a. a logic circuit having one or more input terminals and one output terminal, the output being switched between two voltage levels determined by the combination of input signals
b. a circuit used in radar that allows only a fraction of the input signal to pass
9. (Electronics) the electrode region or regions in a field-effect transistor that is biased to control the conductivity of the channel between the source and drain
10. (Photography) a component in a motion-picture camera or projector that holds each frame flat and momentarily stationary behind the lens
11. (Automotive Engineering) a slotted metal frame that controls the positions of the gear lever in a motor vehicle
12. (Rowing) rowing a hinged clasp to prevent the oar from jumping out of a rowlock
13. (Mechanical Engineering) a frame surrounding the blade or blades of a saw
vb (tr)
14. to provide with a gate or gates
15. (Education) Brit to restrict (a student) to the school or college grounds as a punishment
16. (General Physics) to select (part of a waveform) in terms of amplitude or time
[Old English geat; related to Old Frisian jet opening, Old Norse gat opening, passage]
ˈgateless adj
ˈgateˌlike adj

gate

(ɡeɪt)
n
1. (Metallurgy) the channels by which molten metal is poured into a mould
2. (Metallurgy) the metal that solidifies in such channels
[C17: probably related to Old English gyte a pouring out, geotan to pour]

gate

(ɡeɪt)
n
1. a way, road, street, or path
2. a way or method of doing something
[C13: from Old Norse gata path; related to Old High German gazza road, street]

gate1

(geɪt)

n., v. gat•ed, gat•ing. n.
1. a movable barrier, usu. on hinges, closing an opening in a fence, wall, or other enclosure.
2. an opening permitting passage through an enclosure.
3. a tower, architectural setting, etc., for defending or adorning such an opening or for providing a monumental entrance to a street, park, etc.
4. any means of access or entrance: the gate to success.
5. a mountain pass.
6. any movable barrier, as at a tollbooth or a railroad crossing.
8. a gateway or passageway in a passenger terminal or pier that leads to a place for boarding a train, plane, or ship.
9. a sliding barrier for regulating the passage of water, steam, or the like, as in a dam or pipe; valve.
10.
a. an obstacle in a slalom race, consisting of two upright poles anchored in the snow a certain distance apart.
b. the opening between these poles, through which a competitor in a slalom race must ski.
11. the total number of persons who pay for admission to an athletic contest, a performance, an exhibition, etc.
12. the total receipts from such admissions.
13. a temporary channel in a cell membrane through which substances diffuse into or out of a cell.
14. a circuit with one output that is actuated only by certain combinations of two or more inputs.
15. the gate, rejection; dismissal: to give a boyfriend the gate.
v.t.
16. (at British universities) to punish by confining to the college grounds.
17. to control the operation of (an electronic device) by means of a gate.
[before 900; Old English geat (pl. gatu), c. Old Frisian gat hole, Old Saxon: eye of a needle; compare gate2]

gate2

(geɪt)

n.
Archaic. a path; way.
[1150–1200; Middle English < Old Norse gata path]

-gate

a combining form extracted from Watergate, occurring as the final element in journalistic coinages, usu. nonce words, that name scandals resulting from concealed crime or other improprieties in government or business: Irangate.

Gate

 the number of people attending a sporting event, usually football matches, 1888.

gate


Past participle: gated
Gerund: gating

Imperative
gate
gate
Present
I gate
you gate
he/she/it gates
we gate
you gate
they gate
Preterite
I gated
you gated
he/she/it gated
we gated
you gated
they gated
Present Continuous
I am gating
you are gating
he/she/it is gating
we are gating
you are gating
they are gating
Present Perfect
I have gated
you have gated
he/she/it has gated
we have gated
you have gated
they have gated
Past Continuous
I was gating
you were gating
he/she/it was gating
we were gating
you were gating
they were gating
Past Perfect
I had gated
you had gated
he/she/it had gated
we had gated
you had gated
they had gated
Future
I will gate
you will gate
he/she/it will gate
we will gate
you will gate
they will gate
Future Perfect
I will have gated
you will have gated
he/she/it will have gated
we will have gated
you will have gated
they will have gated
Future Continuous
I will be gating
you will be gating
he/she/it will be gating
we will be gating
you will be gating
they will be gating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been gating
you have been gating
he/she/it has been gating
we have been gating
you have been gating
they have been gating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been gating
you will have been gating
he/she/it will have been gating
we will have been gating
you will have been gating
they will have been gating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been gating
you had been gating
he/she/it had been gating
we had been gating
you had been gating
they had been gating
Conditional
I would gate
you would gate
he/she/it would gate
we would gate
you would gate
they would gate
Past Conditional
I would have gated
you would have gated
he/she/it would have gated
we would have gated
you would have gated
they would have gated

gate

Arrangement of transistors that works on pulses travelling through a computer’s circuits.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gate - a movable barrier in a fence or wallgate - a movable barrier in a fence or wall
head gate - a gate upstream from a lock or canal that is used to control the flow of water at the upper end
flexible joint, hinge - a joint that holds two parts together so that one can swing relative to the other
lock - a fastener fitted to a door or drawer to keep it firmly closed
lock-gate - a gate that can be locked
lichgate, lychgate - a roofed gate to a churchyard, formerly used as a temporary shelter for the bier during funerals
movable barrier - a barrier that can be moved to allow passage
portcullis - gate consisting of an iron or wooden grating that hangs in the entry to a castle or fortified town; can be lowered to prevent passage
postern - a small gate in the rear of a fort or castle
tailboard, tailgate - a gate at the rear of a vehicle; can be lowered for loading
tail gate - a gate downstream from a lock or canal that is used to control the flow of water at the lower end
tollbar, tollgate - a gate or bar across a toll bridge or toll road which is lifted when the toll is paid
turnpike - (from 16th to 19th centuries) gates set across a road to prevent passage until a toll had been paid
turnstile - a gate consisting of a post that acts as a pivot for rotating arms; set in a passageway for controlling the persons entering
wicket door, wicket gate, wicket - small gate or door (especially one that is part of a larger door)
2.gate - a computer circuit with several inputs but only one output that can be activated by particular combinations of inputs
AND circuit, AND gate - a circuit in a computer that fires only when all of its inputs fire
computer circuit - a circuit that is part of a computer
NAND circuit, NAND gate - a logic gate that produces an output that is the inverse of the output of an AND gate
OR circuit, OR gate - a gate circuit in a computer that fires when any of its inputs fire
XOR circuit, X-OR circuit, XOR gate - gate for exclusive OR; a circuit in a computer that fires only if only one of its inputs fire
3.gate - total admission receipts at a sports event
receipts, revenue, gross - the entire amount of income before any deductions are made
4.gate - passageway (as in an air terminal) where passengers can embark or disembark
air terminal, airport terminal - a terminal that serves air travelers or air freight
arrival gate - gate where passengers disembark
departure gate - gate where passengers embark
passageway - a passage between rooms or between buildings
Verb1.gate - supply with a gate; "The house was gated"
architecture - the profession of designing buildings and environments with consideration for their esthetic effect
furnish, provide, supply, render - give something useful or necessary to; "We provided the room with an electrical heater"
2.gate - control with a valve or other device that functions like a gate
control, operate - handle and cause to function; "do not operate machinery after imbibing alcohol"; "control the lever"
3.gate - restrict (school boys') movement to the dormitory or campus as a means of punishment
confine, limit, throttle, trammel, restrain, restrict, bound - place limits on (extent or access); "restrict the use of this parking lot"; "limit the time you can spend with your friends"

gate

noun barrier, opening, door, access, port (Scot.), entrance, exit, gateway, portal, egress He opened the gate and walked up to the house.

gate

noun
The amount of money collected as admission, especially to a sporting event:
Translations
بوابةبوَّابَةبَوّابَه
bránavratazávora
portlåge
بابدرب
porttipuomi
ulazna vrata
kapusorompó
hliî
ゲート売上げ遮断機
porta
ateiti nekviestameiti nekviestamįeiti be bilietonekviestas svečiasvartų šulas
vārti
vráta
vrata
bomgrindport
ประตู
cổng

gate

[geɪt]
A. N
1. [of wood] → puerta f (also of town, castle); [of metal] → verja f; (= sluice) → compuerta f; [of field, in station] → barrera f (Sport) → entrada f
please go to gate sevendiríjanse a la puerta siete
2. (Sport) (= attendance) → público m, concurrencia f; (= entrance money) → taquilla f, recaudación f
B. VT (Brit) [+ pupil] → prohibir la salida fuera del recinto escolar (como castigo)
C. CPD gate money Ntaquilla f, recaudación f

gate

[ˈgeɪt] n
[garden] → portail m
[farm, at level crossing] → barrière f
[building, town, at airport] → porte f
[lock] → vanne f
(= attendance at match) → nombre m de spectateurs

gate

n
Tor nt; (small, = garden gate) → Pforte f; (= five-barred gate)Gatter nt; (in station) → Sperre f; (in airport) → Flugsteig m; (of level crossing)Schranke f; (Sport: = starting gate) → Startmaschine f; (= sports ground entrance)Einlass m, → Eingang m; to open/shut the gate(s)das Tor etc öffnen/schließen; the gates of heavendas Himmelstor, die Himmelstür or -pforte
(Sport: = attendance) → Zuschauerzahl f; (= entrance money)Einnahmen pl
vt pupil, studentAusgangssperre erteilen (+dat)

gate

:
gate-crash (inf)
vt to gate a party/meetingin eine Party/Versammlung reinplatzen (inf); (crowd: = to disrupt it) → eine Party/Versammlung stürmen
vieinfach so hingehen (inf)
gate-crasher
nungeladener Gast; (at meeting) → Eindringling m

gate

:
gatehouse
nPförtnerhaus or -häuschen nt
gatekeeper
nPförtner(in) m(f); (Rail) → Schrankenwärter(in) m(f)
gate-leg(ged) table
nKlapptisch m
gate money
n (Sport) → Einnahmen pl
gatepost
nTorpfosten m; between you, me and the gate (inf)unter uns gesagt
gateway
n (lit, fig)Tor nt(to zu); (= archway, gate frame)Torbogen m
gateway drug

gate

[geɪt] n
a. (in garden, field) → cancello; (of castle, town) (Skiing) → porta; (at airport) → uscita; (at level crossing) → barriera
b. (Sport) (attendance) → (numero di) spettatori mpl, presenze fpl; (entrance money) → incassi mpl

gate

(geit) noun
(a metal, wooden etc doorlike object which closes) the opening in a wall, fence etc through which people etc pass. I'll meet you at the park gate(s).
ˈgate-crash verb
to enter or go to (a party, meeting etc) without being invited or without paying.
ˈgate-crasher noun
ˈgate-post noun
a post to which a gate is fixed.
ˈgateway noun
an opening or entrance into a city etc, which contains a gate.

gate

بوَّابَة brána port Tor πύλη puerta portti portail ulazna vrata cancello hek port brama portão ворота grind ประตู kapı cổng 大门
References in classic literature ?
As the gate clashed behind them, a voice cried from a window.
Joe fell in love with Sarah King, a lean, sad-looking woman who lived with her father and brother in a brick house that stood opposite the gate leading to the Wines- burg Cemetery.
ON SATURDAY AMBROSCH drove up to the back gate, and Antonia jumped down from the wagon and ran into our kitchen just as she used to do.
He said that after the wall-paper was changed it would be the heavy bedstead, and then the barred windows, and then that gate at the head of the stairs, and so on.
And when Christie, more fascinating than ever in her riding-habit, took her place on the other side of Dick, as they sallied from the gate, that gentleman felt his cup of happiness complete.
His duties all performed, --the highest prosperity attained,--his race and future generations fixed on a stable basis, and with a stately roof to shelter them for centuries to come,--what other upward step remained for this good man to take, save the final step from earth to the golden gate of heaven
Such was the appearance of Ichabod and his steed as they shambled out of the gate of Hans Van Ripper, and it was altogether such an apparition as is seldom to be met with in broad daylight.
he repeated as if retreating for a jump, yet leaving his thought so unfinished that, after we had come into the gate, another stop, which he imposed on me by the pressure of his arm, had become inevitable.
It has a sort of howdah on its back, and its distended tusked mouth into which the billows are rolling, might be taken for the Traitors' Gate leading from the Thames by water into the Tower.
And when he glanced upon the green walls of the watery defile in which the ship was then sailing, and bethought him that through that gate lay the route to his vengeance, and beheld, how that through that same gate he was now both chasing and being chased to his deadly end; and not only that, but a herd of remorseless wild pirates and inhuman atheistical devils were infernally cheering him on with their curses; --when all these conceits had passed through his brain, Ahab's brow was left gaunt and ribbed, like the black sand beach after some stormy tide has been gnawing it, without being able to drag the firm thing from its place.
Over the hedge on one side we looked into a plowed field, and on the other we looked over a gate at our master's house, which stood by the roadside; at the top of the meadow was a grove of fir trees, and at the bottom a running brook overhung by a steep bank.
Tellson's Bank, established in the Saint Germain Quarter of Paris, was in a wing of a large house, approached by a courtyard and shut off from the street by a high wall and a strong gate.