gateway drug

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gateway drug

n.
A drug or other ingested substance, such as alcohol or marijuana, whose habitual use is thought to lead to the use of very addictive and dangerous drugs such as cocaine and heroin.

gateway drug

n
(Recreational Drugs) a recreational drug such as cannabis, the use of which is believed by some to encourage the user to try stronger drugs

gate′way drug`


n.
any mood-altering drug, as a stimulant or tranquilizer, that does not cause physical dependence but may lead to the use of addictive drugs, as heroin.
[1985–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gateway drug - a habit-forming drug that is not addictive but its use may lead to the use of other addictive drugs; "one college athlete recently called beer a gateway drug for young people"
drug of abuse, street drug - a drug that is taken for nonmedicinal reasons (usually for mind-altering effects); drug abuse can lead to physical and mental damage and (with some substances) dependence and addiction
References in periodicals archive ?
Users of these medicines were 20 times more likely than non-users to report that they had taken the highly addictive and even potentially deadly illegal drug heroin in the past year, indicating that these medications might be gateway drugs for a portion of people who first begin taking them as legal prescriptions.
These medications are federally controlled substances and gateway drugs to heroin.
Data examining smoking and its related health issues seems to come in waves, from the addictive nature of nicotine, to the harms of second-hand smoke, to most recently, the idea that e-cigarettes are potential gateway drugs (New England Journal of Medicine, Sept.
Nygren is backing several bills that would make it harder to get prescription pain killers, which are often gateway drugs to heroin abuse.
igarettes and alcohol serve as gateway drugs, which people use before progressing to the use of marijuana and then to cocaine and other illicit substances, this progression is called the "gateway sequence" of drug use.
A landmark study in mice identifies a biological mechanism that could help explain how tobacco products could act as gateway drugs, increasing a person's future likelihood of abusing cocaine and perhaps other drugs as well, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health.
Perception of harm for gateway drugs, tobacco, alcohol, marijuana as well as illicit drugs increased overall; and
Today, we may name different gateway drugs, sexual fantasies or visions of wealth, fame and power, but they all still tempt us to indulge insatiable appetites.
This counselor admits he sees an alarming trend of teens using more drugs today than ever before, and some are skipping the gateway drugs, such as marijuana, and heading straight for methamphetamines and ecstasy.
Five gateway drugs were studied in relation to family structure, in addition to total drug involvement, affiliation with drug-using peers, and perceptions of peer attitudes toward drug use.

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