gatherer


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gath·er

 (găth′ər)
v. gath·ered, gath·er·ing, gath·ers
v.tr.
1.
a. To collect from different places; assemble: gather the pieces of a puzzle; gather information.
b. To cause to come together; convene: The teacher gathered the students around the exhibit.
c. To draw (something or someone) closer to oneself: gathered the shawl about my shoulders; gathered the child in her arms.
d. To draw into small folds or puckers, as by pulling a thread through cloth.
e. To contract and wrinkle (the brow).
2. To harvest or pick: gather crops; gather mushrooms.
3. To conclude or infer, as from evidence: I gather a decision has not been reached.
4. To summon up; muster: gathered up his courage.
5.
a. To accumulate (something) gradually; amass: The top of the bookshelf gathered dust.
b. To attract or be the center of attraction for: The jugglers gathered a large crowd.
6. To gain by a process of gradual increase: gather speed.
7. To pick up or collect (molten glass) using a tool in glass blowing.
v.intr.
1. To come together in a group; assemble: A crowd gathered in the lobby.
2. To accumulate: Dark clouds are gathering.
3. To grow or increase by degrees: The truck's speed gathered on the downslope.
4. To come to a head, as a boil; fester.
5. To forage for wild foodstuffs.
n.
1. The act or an instance of gathering.
2. Something gathered, especially:
a. A small fold or pucker made by gathering cloth.
b. A mass of molten glass collected on the end of a blowpipe or other glass-blowing tool.

[Middle English getheren, gaderen, from Old English gadrian; see ghedh- in Indo-European roots.]

gath′er·er n.
Synonyms: gather, collect1, assemble, congregate, accumulate, amass
These verbs mean to bring or come together in a group or aggregate. Gather is the most widely applicable: I gathered sticks for the fire. Clouds gathered in the evening sky. Collect frequently refers to the careful selection of like or related things that become part of an organized whole: She collects stamps as a hobby. In other contexts, collect suggests the gradual process by which similar items or materials come together to form a distinct mass: Dust collected on the shelves. Leaves collected in the gutter. Assemble implies a definite and usually close relationship. With respect to persons, the term suggests convening out of common interest or purpose: Assembling an able staff was more difficult than expected. The reporters assembled for the press conference. With respect to things, assemble implies gathering and fitting together components: The curator is assembling an interesting exhibit of Stone Age artifacts. Congregate refers chiefly to the coming together of a large number of persons or animals: The students congregated after class to compare notes. Accumulate applies to the increase of like or related things over an extended period: They accumulated enough capital to invest. Old newspapers accumulated in the basement. Amass refers to the collection or accumulation of things, often valuable things, to form an imposing quantity: Their families had amassed great fortunes. Rocks had amassed at the bottom of the glacier. See Also Synonyms at reap.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gatherer - a person who gathersgatherer - a person who gathers; "they were a society of hunters and gatherers"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
2.gatherer - a person who is employed to collect payments (as for rent or taxes)gatherer - a person who is employed to collect payments (as for rent or taxes)
worker - a person who works at a specific occupation; "he is a good worker"
conductor - the person who collects fares on a public conveyance
gleaner - someone who gathers something in small pieces (e.g. information) slowly and carefully
rent collector - a person who goes from house to house collecting rents for the owner
revenue enhancement, tax, taxation - charge against a citizen's person or property or activity for the support of government
Translations

gatherer

[ˈgæðərəʳ] N [of wood, flowers] → recolector(a) m/f
intelligence gathererrecopilador(a) m/f de información
see also hunter B

gatherer

nSammler(in) m(f) ? hunter-gatherer
References in classic literature ?
Hester bade little Pearl run down to the margin of the water, and play with the shells and tangled sea-weed, until she should have talked awhile with yonder gatherer of herbs.
As when Jove, gatherer of the thunder-cloud, spreads a dense canopy on the top of some lofty mountain, and all the peaks, the jutting headlands, and forest glades show out in the great light that flashes from the bursting heavens, even so when the Danaans had now driven back the fire from their ships, they took breath for a little while; but the fury of the fight was not yet over, for the Trojans were not driven back in utter rout, but still gave battle, and were ousted from their ground only by sheer fighting.
But I would not have thee to go in anger, thinking hardly of me - a gatherer of cow-dung and grass at Shamlegh, but still a woman of substance.
1-27) Or like here who left home and country and came to Thebes, following warlike Amphitryon, -- even Alemena, the daughter of Electyron, gatherer of the people.
So in one night Zeus shared the bed and love of the neat- ankled daughter of Electyron and fulfilled his desire; and in the same night Amphitryon, gatherer of the people, the glorious hero, came to his house when he had ended his great task.
If the gatherer gathers too much, Nature takes out of the man what she puts into his chest; swells the estate, but kills the owner.
The money he took from the King's tax gatherers he returned to the miserable peasants of the district, and once when Henry III sent a little expedition against him he surrounded and captured the entire force, and, stripping them, gave their clothing to the poor, and escorted them naked back to the very gates of London.
The complaint accuses the recall campaign of using paid signature gatherers who aren't registered with the state, and of improperly circulating "single signer" sheets, which are intended to be filled out by voters by themselves without any help from a campaign signature gatherer.
So successful is she as a gatherer that I'm sick of the damned things.
We are the largest gatherer in the Woodford Shale, the largest gatherer and processor in the Marcellus Shale, and we have a growing presence in the Granite Wash and Haynesville Shale.
British statistician Dr Derek Gatherer has analysed voting patterns since 1975 and has identified several major alliances.
The explanation might date back to humans' hunter-gatherer days, when women were the primary gatherers and would have benefited from an ability to home in on ripe, red fruits," she said.