gaudy

(redirected from gaudier)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

gaud·y 1

 (gô′dē)
adj. gaud·i·er, gaud·i·est
Showy in a tasteless or vulgar way. See Synonyms at garish.

[Possibly from gaudy (influenced by gaud).]

gaud′i·ly adv.
gaud′i·ness n.

gaud·y 2

 (gô′dē)
n. pl. gaud·ies Chiefly British
A feast, especially an annual university dinner.

[Middle English gaudi, gaud, prank, trick, possibly from Old French gaudie, merriment (from gaudir, to enjoy, make merry, from Latin gaudēre, to rejoice) and from Latin gaudium, enjoyment, merry-making (from gaudēre, to rejoice; see gāu- in Indo-European roots).]

gaudy

(ˈɡɔːdɪ)
adj, gaudier or gaudiest
gay, bright, or colourful in a crude or vulgar manner; garish
[C16: from gaud]
ˈgaudily adv
ˈgaudiness n

gaudy

(ˈɡɔːdɪ)
n, pl gaudies
(Education) Brit a celebratory festival or feast held at some schools and colleges
[C16: from Latin gaudium joy, from gaudēre to rejoice]

gaud•y1

(ˈgɔ di)

adj. gaud•i•er, gaud•i•est.
1. showy in a tasteless way; flashy; tawdry.
2. ostentatiously ornamented; garish.
[1520–30; taken as a derivative of gaud]
gaud′i•ly, adv.
gaud′i•ness, n.

gaud•y2

(ˈgɔ di)

n., pl. gaud•ies. Brit.
an annual college feast.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin gaudium joy, delight]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gaudy - (Britain) a celebratory reunion feast or entertainment held a college
banquet, feast - a ceremonial dinner party for many people
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Adj.1.gaudy - tastelessly showygaudy - tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"
tasteless - lacking aesthetic or social taste
2.gaudy - (used especially of clothes) marked by conspicuous display
colourful, colorful - striking in variety and interest; "a colorful period of history"; "a colorful character"; "colorful language"

gaudy

adjective garish, bright, glaring, vulgar, brilliant, flash (informal), loud, brash, tacky (informal), flashy, tasteless, jazzy (informal), tawdry, showy, gay, ostentatious, raffish a gaudy orange-and-purple hat
conservative, quiet, elegant, modest, dull, subtle, refined, sedate, tasteful, colourless

gaudy

adjective
Tastelessly showy:
Informal: tacky.
Translations
مُبَهْرَج الألْوان
křiklavý
skræpóttur; glyslegur
rėžiančių spalvų
spilgtsuzkrītošs
cicili biciliparlak renkli

gaudy

[ˈgɔːdɪ] ADJ (gaudier (compar) (gaudiest (superl))) [colour, clothes] → chillón, llamativo; [shop, display] → ordinario, chabacano

gaudy

[ˈgɔːdi] adjvoyant(e)

gaudy

adj (+er) clothes, paint etcknallig (inf), → auffällig bunt; coloursknallig (inf)

gaudy

[ˈgɔːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → vistoso/a, chiassoso/a

gaudy

(ˈgoːdi) adjective
very bright in colour. a bird's gaudy plumage; gaudy clothes.
References in classic literature ?
But no, there was something gaudier even than this.
Jim said he would "jis' 's soon have tobacker in his coffee;" and found so much fault with it, and with the work and bother of raising the mullen, and jews-harping the rats, and petting and flattering up the snakes and spiders and things, on top of all the other work he had to do on pens, and in- scriptions, and journals, and things, which made it more trouble and worry and responsibility to be a prisoner than anything he ever undertook, that Tom most lost all patience with him; and said he was just loadened down with more gaudier chances than a prisoner ever had in the world to make a name for himself, and yet he didn't know enough to appreciate them, and they was just about wasted on him.
Kingdom and lordship, power and estate, are a gaudier vocabulary than private John and Edward in a small house and common day's work; but the things of life are the same to both; the sum total of both is the same.
Contract notice: Machinery equipment for the wood workshop lp gaudier brzeska in st jean de braye (45).
November saw two Conde Nast-founded publications fold: first up was Lucky magazine, once a product that could boast 1&nbsp;million subscriptions, catering to a more thrifty audience for women's fashion than its gaudier cousin, Vogue.
In the 1910s the First World War and the death of Gaudier Brzeska determined for Pound the reasons of his poetry and of The Cantos then in fieri: these reasons can be syncretized in a vorticist sense with these lines from the Pisan Cantos (Canto 78), where Pound is quoting the Spring and Autumn Annals, that he attributed to Confucius:
The Tory Burch for Fitbit line of pendants, bracelets and wristbands (starting at $38) tracks fitness and sleep like some gaudier wearables but is made to match your discerning tastes or those of a fashionista you love.
Long after retirement, Robbie still wore his old Navy khakis every day at the range, his only salute to fashion being his love of tall, fancy cowboy boots, the gaudier the better.
The cover is a less garish version of some of the far gaudier artwork that adorned the covers of magazines such as Super Science Stories in the 1940s (Saler 93).
In politics, though, power and success often flow to the less brilliant who accept their own limitations and take full advantage of the gaudier intellects around them.
Cafes are the place for coffee, a glass of wine, and, above all, people watching; bistros are for lunch and dinner and serve hearty, classic bourgeois cuisine; brasseries are similar to bistros but often are gaudier and seafood is the specialty, especially raw bar items; a bar is for martinis or sidecars; restaurants are the top of the order, formal establishments with a serious chef in the kitchen and an impressive wine cellar.
Driz said Gaudier was shot in the chest while Damian was hit in the buttocks.