gaudy


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gaud·y 1

 (gô′dē)
adj. gaud·i·er, gaud·i·est
Showy in a tasteless or vulgar way. See Synonyms at garish.

[Possibly from gaudy (influenced by gaud).]

gaud′i·ly adv.
gaud′i·ness n.

gaud·y 2

 (gô′dē)
n. pl. gaud·ies Chiefly British
A feast, especially an annual university dinner.

[Middle English gaudi, gaud, prank, trick, possibly from Old French gaudie, merriment (from gaudir, to enjoy, make merry, from Latin gaudēre, to rejoice) and from Latin gaudium, enjoyment, merry-making (from gaudēre, to rejoice; see gāu- in Indo-European roots).]

gaudy

(ˈɡɔːdɪ)
adj, gaudier or gaudiest
gay, bright, or colourful in a crude or vulgar manner; garish
[C16: from gaud]
ˈgaudily adv
ˈgaudiness n

gaudy

(ˈɡɔːdɪ)
n, pl gaudies
(Education) Brit a celebratory festival or feast held at some schools and colleges
[C16: from Latin gaudium joy, from gaudēre to rejoice]

gaud•y1

(ˈgɔ di)

adj. gaud•i•er, gaud•i•est.
1. showy in a tasteless way; flashy; tawdry.
2. ostentatiously ornamented; garish.
[1520–30; taken as a derivative of gaud]
gaud′i•ly, adv.
gaud′i•ness, n.

gaud•y2

(ˈgɔ di)

n., pl. gaud•ies. Brit.
an annual college feast.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin gaudium joy, delight]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gaudy - (Britain) a celebratory reunion feast or entertainment held a college
banquet, feast - a ceremonial dinner party for many people
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
Adj.1.gaudy - tastelessly showygaudy - tastelessly showy; "a flash car"; "a flashy ring"; "garish colors"; "a gaudy costume"; "loud sport shirts"; "a meretricious yet stylish book"; "tawdry ornaments"
tasteless - lacking aesthetic or social taste
2.gaudy - (used especially of clothes) marked by conspicuous display
colourful, colorful - striking in variety and interest; "a colorful period of history"; "a colorful character"; "colorful language"

gaudy

adjective garish, bright, glaring, vulgar, brilliant, flash (informal), loud, brash, tacky (informal), flashy, tasteless, jazzy (informal), tawdry, showy, gay, ostentatious, raffish a gaudy orange-and-purple hat
conservative, quiet, elegant, modest, dull, subtle, refined, sedate, tasteful, colourless

gaudy

adjective
Tastelessly showy:
Informal: tacky.
Translations
مُبَهْرَج الألْوان
křiklavý
skræpóttur; glyslegur
rėžiančių spalvų
spilgtsuzkrītošs
cicili biciliparlak renkli

gaudy

[ˈgɔːdɪ] ADJ (gaudier (compar) (gaudiest (superl))) [colour, clothes] → chillón, llamativo; [shop, display] → ordinario, chabacano

gaudy

[ˈgɔːdi] adjvoyant(e)

gaudy

adj (+er) clothes, paint etcknallig (inf), → auffällig bunt; coloursknallig (inf)

gaudy

[ˈgɔːdɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → vistoso/a, chiassoso/a

gaudy

(ˈgoːdi) adjective
very bright in colour. a bird's gaudy plumage; gaudy clothes.
References in classic literature ?
But there were vacant seats here and there, and into one of them she was ushered, between brilliantly dressed women who had gone there to kill time and eat candy and display their gaudy attire.
Still that breathing silence, which marks the drowsy sultriness of an American landscape in July, pervaded the secluded spot, interrupted only by the low voices of the men, the occasional and lazy tap of a woodpecker, the discordant cry of some gaudy jay, or a swelling on the ear, from the dull roar of a distant waterfall.
It was here that they made those products with the wonders of which they pestered him so--by placards that defaced the landscape when he traveled, and by staring advertisements in the newspapers and magazines--by silly little jingles that he could not get out of his mind, and gaudy pictures that lurked for him around every street corner.
He was much over-dressed, in a gaudy vest of many colors, a blue neckerchief, bedropped gayly with yellow spots, and arranged with a flaunting tie, quite in keeping with the general air of the man.
It made me homesick to look around over this proud and gaudy but heartless barrenness and remember that in our house in East Hartford, all unpretending as it was, you couldn't go into a room but you would find an insurance-chromo, or at least a three-color God-Bless-Our-Home over the door; and in the parlor we had nine.
The amphitheatre was packed, from the bull-ring to the highest row - twelve thousand people in one circling mass, one slanting, solid mass - royalties, nobles, clergy, ladies, gentlemen, state officials, generals, admirals, soldiers, sailors, lawyers, thieves, merchants, brokers, cooks, housemaids, scullery-maids, doubtful women, dudes, gamblers, beggars, loafers, tramps, American ladies, gentlemen, preachers, English ladies, gentlemen, preachers, German ditto, French ditto, and so on and so on, all the world represented: Spaniards to admire and praise, foreigners to enjoy and go home and find fault - there they were, one solid, sloping, circling sweep of rippling and flashing color under the downpour of the summer sun - just a garden, a gaudy, gorgeous flower-garden
In another small room is an unpainted wooden table, and behind it sit half-life-size waxen figures of the Holy Family, made by the very worst artist that ever lived, perhaps, and clothed in gaudy, flimsy drapery.
I read considerable to Jim about kings and dukes and earls and such, and how gaudy they dressed, and how much style they put on, and called each other your majesty, and your grace, and your lordship, and so on, 'stead of mister; and Jim's eyes bugged out, and he was interested.
As the barkeeper climbed along up, bowing and smiling to everybody, and at last got to the platform, these tents were jerked up aloft all of a sudden, and we saw four noble thrones of gold, all caked with jewels, and in the two middle ones sat old white-whiskered men, and in the two others a couple of the most glorious and gaudy giants, with platter halos and beautiful armor.
She had caught sight of her new Sunday gown-- a cheap curtain-calico thing, a conflagration of gaudy colors and fantastic figures.
Tom was like the rest of the respectable boys, in that he envied Huckleberry his gaudy outcast condition, and was un- der strict orders not to play with him.
He remembered the other pair of challenging blue ones that had darted coquettish glances through half-dropped lids, shot arrowy beams from under archly lifted brows, and said gravely, "Don't form yourself on her, Rebecca; clover blossoms that grow in the fields beside Sunnybrook mustn't be tied in the same bouquet with gaudy sunflowers; they are too sweet and fragrant and wholesome.