gauntness


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gaunt

 (gônt)
adj. gaunt·er, gaunt·est
1. Thin or emaciated: "Her smile took up ever more of her increasingly gaunt face" (Lindsey Crittenden). See Synonyms at lean2.
2. Bleak or desolate: "She walked along fast ... scared of ... the few shadowy people and the old gaunt houses with their wide inky doorways" (John Dos Passos).

[Middle English, perhaps from Old French gant, possibly of Scandinavian origin.]

gaunt′ly adv.
gaunt′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gauntness - extreme leanness (usually caused by starvation or disease)gauntness - extreme leanness (usually caused by starvation or disease)
leanness, spareness, thinness - the property of having little body fat
Translations
نَحالَه
vyzáblost
magerhed
manneskja sem er horuî/tekin
vycivenosť
cılızlıksıskalık

gauntness

n
(= haggardness)Hagerkeit f; (= emaciation)Abgezehrtheit f
(liter: = starkness, of building) → Tristheit f; (of landscape)Öde f

gauntness

[ˈgɔːntnɪs] n (of person, face) → estrema magrezza

gaunt

(goːnt) adjective
(of a person) thin or thin-faced. a gaunt old woman.
ˈgauntness noun
References in periodicals archive ?
He continued: "I broke the gauntness that had been with me throughout the last period, and of course I did not intend not to score.
Gauntness about him that seemed eternal, him all bowed-up on himself and his bones uprooting from his skin like wings that never fully developed.
intracellularis reduced growth rate, feed intake, and efficiency of gain and increased gauntness and diarrhea.
In addition, the narrator pays particular attention to the old man's poor health: his limp, his "reek / and gauntness," and his longing to be in better condition ("if I was well again") all serve as indices of his physical deterioration.
In many of Stock's photographs, Dean looks older than his twenty-four years due to the gauntness of his face, the dark rings under his eyes and his brooding gaze, and it's impossible to see this hollowness in DeHaan.
i i l The better the piano version is performed the less Ravel's colourful palette is missed and the more one appreciates the gauntness, grandeur and charcoal-sketch delicacy of the original.
And the austerity of the furniture passes description; in its gauntness it reminded one of the ribs of a London 'bus horse.
The eroticization of the gauntness that is the physical manifestation of HIV/AIDS can be compared to the romanticization of tuberculosis in the Victorian era.
So imagine my heartburn last week upon sitting down to a lovely TV dinner balanced on a tray across my knees to see his Gallic gauntness (yes, I know he's actually from Kent, but with a name like that.
Steve Jobs dodged cancer's upper cut for such a long while, but the spotlight finally caught the gauntness of his face, the thinning of his blue jeaned legs, the look of inevitability in his brilliant eyes.
This is a kind of aesthetic exile that implies a deliberate self-distancing from the necessity of formal finishing, given that what had characterized Coetzee's art up to the Nobel ceremony was just this quality of laborious finishedness: "spare prose and a spare, thrifty world" (Coetzee, Doubling 20), chiseled gauntness without any trace of flaccidity or unassimilated matter.