gave


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gave

 (gāv)
v.
Past tense of give.

gave

(ɡeɪv)
vb
the past tense of give

give

(gɪv)

v. gave, giv•en, giv•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to present voluntarily and without expecting compensation: to give a birthday present to someone.
2. to hand to someone: Give me that plate, please.
3. to place in someone's care: I gave the folders to your assistant.
4. to grant (permission, opportunity, etc.) to someone: Give me a chance.
5. to impart or communicate: to give advice; to give a cold to someone.
6. to set forth or show; present; offer: to give no reason for one's actions.
7. to pay or transfer possession to another in exchange for something: They gave five dollars for the picture.
8. to furnish, provide, or proffer: to give evidence.
9. to provide as an entertainment or social function: to give a Halloween party.
10. to administer: to give medicine to a patient.
11. to put forth, emit, or utter; issue: to give a cry.
12. to assign or admit as a basis of calculation or reasoning (usu. used passively): These facts being given, the theory makes sense.
13. to produce, yield, or afford: to give good results.
14. to make, do, or perform: to give a lurch.
15. to perform or present publicly: to give a concert.
16. to cause; be responsible for (usu. fol. by an infinitive): They gave me to understand that you would be there.
17. to care about something to the value or extent of (something signifying “even a little bit”): I don't give a hoot about their opinion. Frankly, I don't give a damn!
18. to relinquish or sacrifice: to give one's life for a cause.
19. to convey or transmit: Give Grandma my love.
20. to assign or allot: They gave him the nickname “Scooter.”
21. to bestow (the object of one's choice), as if by providence: Give me the wide open spaces anytime.
22. to connect, as through a switchboard: Give me 235-7522.
23. to present to an audience: Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the governor of Texas.
24. to attribute or ascribe: to give the devil his due.
25. to cause: Strawberries give me a rash.
26. to apply fully or freely; devote: to give one's attention to a problem.
27. to award by verdict or after consideration: A decision was given for the defendant.
28. to inflict as a punishment on another; impose a sentence of: The judge gave him ten years.
29. to pledge, offer as a pledge, or execute and deliver: She gave him her word.
30. to propose as the subject of a toast (fol. by an indirect object): Ladies and gentlemen, I give you our country.
31. to bear to a man; deliver (fol. by an indirect object): She gave him a beautiful baby boy.
32. to sire upon a woman; father (fol. by an indirect object): He gave her two children in four years.
33. to concede or grant, as a point in an argument.
v.i.
34. to make a gift or gifts; contribute: to give to the United Way.
35. to yield somewhat, as to influence or force; compromise: Each side must give on some points.
36. to yield somewhat when subjected to weight, force, pressure, etc.: A horsehair mattress doesn't give much.
37. to collapse; break down; fall apart: The old chair gave when I sat on it.
38. to be warm and open in relationships with others: a withdrawn person who doesn't know how to give.
39. Informal. to divulge information: Okay now, give! What happened?
40. to afford a view or passage; face, open, or lead (usu. fol. by on, onto, etc.): This door gives onto the hallway.
41. give away,
a. to give as a present; bestow.
b. to present (the bride) to the bridegroom in a marriage ceremony.
c. to disclose, betray, or expose.
42. give back, to return (something), as to the owner; restore.
43. give in,
a. to acknowledge defeat; yield.
b. to hand in; deliver: to give in one's timecard.
44. give of, to devote or contribute generously of: to give of oneself.
45. give off, to put forth; emit: The gardenia gives off a strong fragrance.
46. give out,
a. to send out; emit.
b. to make public; announce.
c. to distribute; issue.
d. to become exhausted or used up.
47. give over,
a. to put into the care or custody of; transfer.
b. to submit fully: She gave herself over to tears.
c. to devote to a specified activity: The day was given over to relaxing.
d. to cease; stop: to give over complaining.
48. give up,
a. to abandon hope; despair.
b. to desist from; renounce: to give up smoking.
c. to surrender; relinquish.
d. to devote (oneself) entirely to.
n.
49. the quality or state of being resilient; springiness.
Idioms:
1. give it to, Informal. to reprimand or punish.
2. give or take, plus or minus a specified amount; more or less.
[before 900; Middle English given (with g- < Scandinavian; compare early Dan give), yiven, yeven, Old English gefan, giefan, c. Old Saxon, Old High German geban, Gothic giban]
giv′er, n.
syn: give, confer, grant, present mean that something concrete or abstract is bestowed on one person by another. give is the general word: to give someone a book. confer usu. means to give as an honor or as a favor; it implies courteous and gracious giving: to confer a medal. grant is usu. limited to the idea of acceding to a request or fulfilling an expressed wish; it often involves a formal act or legal procedure: to grant a prayer; to grant immunity. present, a more formal word than give, usu. implies a certain ceremony in the giving: to present an award.
Translations
gav
donis
beri
gafgaven

give

(giv) past tense gave (geiv) : past participle ˈgiven verb
1. to cause to have. My aunt gave me a book for Christmas; Can you give me an opinion on this?
2. to produce (something). Cows give milk but horses do not; He gave a talk on his travels.
3. to yield, bend, break etc. This lock looks solid, but it will give under pressure.
4. to organize (some event etc). We're giving a party next week.
noun
the ability to yield or bend under pressure. This chair has a lot of give in it.
ˈgiven adjective
1. stated. to do a job at a given time.
2. (with to) in the habit of (doing) something. He's given to making stupid remarks.
3. taking (something) as a fact. Given that x equals three, x plus two equals five.
given name
(American) a personal or christian name.
give and take
willingness to allow someone something in return for being allowed something oneself.
give away
1. to give etc (something) to someone (eg because one no longer wants it). I'm going to give all my money away.
2. to cause or allow (information etc) to become known usually accidentally. He gave away our hiding-place (noun ˈgive-away: the lingering smell was a give-away).
give back
to return something. She gave me back the book that she borrowed last week.
give in
1. to stop fighting and admit defeat; to yield. The soldiers were outnumbered and gave in to the enemy.
2. to hand or bring (something) to someone (often a person in authority). Do we have to give in our books at the end of the lesson?
give off
to produce. That fire is giving off a lot of smoke.
give or take
allowing for the addition or subtraction of. I weigh sixty-five kilos, give or take a little (= approximately sixty-five kilos).
give out
1. to give, usually to several people. The headmaster's wife gave out the school prizes.
2. to come to an end. My patience gave out.
3. to produce. The fire gave out a lot of heat.
give rise to
to cause. This gives rise to a large number of problems.
give up
1. to stop, abandon. I must give up smoking; They gave up the search.
2. to stop using etc. You'll have to give up cigarettes; I won't give up all my hobbies for you.
3. to hand over (eg oneself or something that one has) to someone else.
4. to devote (time etc) to doing something. He gave up all his time to gardening.
5. (often with as or for) to consider (a person, thing etc) to be. You took so long to arrive that we had almost given you up (for lost).
give way
1. to stop in order to allow eg traffic to pass. Give way to traffic coming from the right.
2. to break, collapse etc under pressure. The bridge will give way any day now.
3. to agree against one's will. I have no intention of giving way to demands like that.

gave

pret de give
References in classic literature ?
He knew that the people in the North who gave money gave it for the purpose of helping the whole cause of Negro civilization, and not merely for the advancement of any one school.
In regard to the addresses which I was to make in the North, I recall just one piece of advice which the General gave me.
Then he gave him a lump of silver as big as his head.
But the waves dashed foaming up among the bare rocks at her feet, mingling their cold spray with her tears, and gave no answer to her prayer.
And she gave her grandchildren a bottle of milk and a piece of ham and a loaf of bread, and they set out for the great gloomy wood.
Just as Partridge had uttered that good and pious doctrine, with which the last chapter concluded, they arrived at another cross-way, when a lame fellow in rags asked them for alms; upon which Partridge gave him a severe rebuke, saying, "Every parish ought to keep their own poor.
Piraeus was first to speak: "Telemachus," said he, "I wish you would send some of your women to my house to take away the presents Menelaus gave you.
It would not be easy to determine whether our arrival gave us greater joy, or the inhabitants greater apprehensions, for we could discern a continual tumult in the land, and took notice that the crews of some barks that lay in the harbour were unlading with all possible diligence, to prevent the cargo from falling into our hands, very much indeed to the dissatisfaction of many of our soldiers, who having engaged in this expedition, with no other view than of filling their pockets, were, before the return of our Abyssin, for treating them like enemies, and taking them as a lawful prize.
About four or five days after, they came again for some victuals, and gave the governor an account where they had pitched their tents, and marked themselves out a habitation and plantation; and it was a very convenient place indeed, on the remotest part of the island, NE.
He gave her a vessel of water and then went back to his place and his thoughts, and with his mind busy over his last adventure, he put his gold into a long and narrow purse, which he could easily carry in his belt.
Sancho from his sack, and the goatherd from his pouch, furnished the Ragged One with the means of appeasing his hunger, and what they gave him he ate like a half-witted being, so hastily that he took no time between mouthfuls, gorging rather than swallowing; and while he ate neither he nor they who observed him uttered a word.
The word wind, in this passage, suggested to the minds of some, who afterwards gave an account of this meeting, a coincidence which might, in the spirit of the times, be construed into a special appointment of Providence.