gavel


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gav·el 1

 (găv′əl)
n.
1. A small mallet, especially:
a. One that a judge or presiding officer raps to signal for order.
b. One that an auctioneer raps to mark the end of a transaction.
2. A maul used by masons in fitting stones.
tr.v. gav·eled, gav·el·ing, gav·els also gav·elled or gav·el·ling
To bring about or compel by using a gavel: "The chairman ... tries to gavel the demonstration to an end" (New Yorker).

[Origin unknown.]

gav·el 2

 (găv′əl)
n.
Tribute or rent in ancient and medieval England.

[Middle English, from Old English gafol; see ghabh- in Indo-European roots.]

gavel

(ˈɡævəl)
n
1. a small hammer used by a chairman, auctioneer, etc, to call for order or attention
2. (Mining & Quarrying) a hammer used by masons to trim rough edges off stones
[C19: of unknown origin]

gav•el1

(ˈgæv əl)

n., v. -eled, -el•ing or (esp. Brit.) -elled, -el•ling. n.
1. a small mallet used esp. by the presiding officer of a meeting or a judge usu. to signal for attention or order.
2. a similar mallet used by an auctioneer to indicate acceptance of the final bid.
v.t.
3. to begin or put into effect by striking a gavel: to gavel the committee into session.
[1795–1805, Amer.; orig. uncertain]

gav•el2

(ˈgæv əl)

n.
feudal rent or tribute.
[before 900; Middle English govel, Old English gafol, akin to giefan to give; compare gabelle]

Gavel

 the quantity of grain to make a sheaf; a bundle of hay, rushes, or similar grasses, 1611. See also math.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gavel - a small mallet used by a presiding officer or a judgegavel - a small mallet used by a presiding officer or a judge
beetle, mallet - a tool resembling a hammer but with a large head (usually wooden); used to drive wedges or ram down paving stones or for crushing or beating or flattening or smoothing
Translations

gavel

[ˈgævl] Nmartillo m (de presidente de reunión o subastador)

gavel

[ˈgævəl] nmarteau m (de commissaire-priseur, de magistrat, etc)

gavel

nHammer m

gavel

[ˈgævl] nmartelletto
References in classic literature ?
There was a general burst of laughter, plentifully accented with whistlings and catcalls, but the energetic use of the gavel presently restored something like order.
Down went group after group of torches, and presently above the deafening clatter of the gavel, roar of angry voices, and crash of succumbing benches, rose the paralyzing cry of "fire
It was a business meeting, and was transacted in English, but that made no difference to Marija; she said what was in her, and all the pounding of the chairman's gavel and all the uproar and confusion in the room could not prevail.
So high has been the death-rate among these isolated companies that at a recent conven- tion of telephone agents, the chairman's gavel was made of thirty-five pieces of wood, taken from thirty-five switchboards of thirty-five extinct companies.
Amicus is a registered trademark of Gavel & Gown Software, Inc.
SANTA CLARITA - Pledging to support local businesses and protect the quality of life, Councilman Bob Kellar took the gavel Tuesday, becoming mayor of Santa Clarita for the first time since he was elected to the council in 2000.
Everyone gets wrapped up in the challenge of the bidding when Ursula has the gavel.
Kintera polling software offers Web visitors an opportunity to vote for winners for two essay contests, "Gavel in the Future" and "Speak out for the Future," which will award winners the opportunity to gavel open the Convention and speak during primetime.
SANTA CLARITA - Pledging to create a new era of collaboration and partnership, Councilman Frank Ferry took the gavel Tuesday, becoming mayor of Santa Clarita.
I am proud to pass the gavel to Janice," Colonna said.
Lake Sherwood resident Jim Cathcart received the prestigious Golden Gavel Award from Toastmasters International at a ceremony Aug.
Gomez first recused himself late Tuesday, passing on the gavel to Yousefian, who then announced that he had to recuse himself.