gavelkind


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Related to gavelkind: Ultimogeniture

gav·el·kind

 (găv′əl-kīnd′)
n.
An English system of land tenure dating from Anglo-Saxon times and continuing in Kent until 1926, in which land was divided equally among all qualified heirs.

[Middle English gavelkinde : Old English gafol, gavel; see gavel2 + Old English gecynd, kind; see kind2.]

gavelkind

(ˈɡævəlˌkaɪnd)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a former system of land tenure peculiar to Kent based on the payment of rent to the lord instead of the performance of services by the tenant
2. (Historical Terms) the land subject to such tenure
3. (Law) English law (formerly) land held under this system
[C13: from Old English gafol tribute + gecynd kind2]

gav•el•kind

(ˈgæv əlˌkaɪnd)

n. Eng. Law.
1. land tenure paid for in money or produce rather than labor or military service.
2. a system of tenure in which land was divided equally among the holder's heirs.
[1175–1225; Old English gafel gavel2 + (ge)cynd kind2]

gavelkind

British. Obsolete. 1. the equal division of the land of an intestate deceased among his sons.
2. a tenant’s right to dispose of his land by feoffment at age fifteen.
3. land not escheating in the event the tenant was convicted as a felon.
See also: Property and Ownership
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of this, even potentially confusing issues such as dower, tails male, jointure, gavelkind and socage are made accessible.
Gavelkind, which allowed all of the sons to inherit equally, predated primogeniture and predominated up to the Norman conquest of 1066.
Unlike other national groups, the Welsh failed to unify, partly because of the effects of gavelkind - equal division of property among sons - within a territory lacking rich agricultural land as a route to wealth and hence trade and urban development.
They asserted that Henry's claim to the lands trumped hers because of the custom of gavelkind, an ancient form of land tenure that still survived mainly in Kent.
While some generalizations about Irish society in the pre-Famine decades hold true such as its dependence on the potato, others such as increased female fertility and early marriages to explain the demographic growth, and the role of gavelkind inheritance in the declining fortunes of Catholic landholders, do not.