gayety


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gay·e·ty

 (gā′ĭ-tē)
n.
Variant of gaiety.

gayety

(ˈɡeɪɪtɪ)
n
esp US a variant spelling of gaiety

gai•e•ty

(ˈgeɪ ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality or state of being gay or cheerful; merriment.
2. Often, gaieties. merrymaking or festivity: the gaieties of the New Year season.
3. showiness; finery: gaiety of dress.
Sometimes, gayety.
[1625–35; < French gaieté=gai gay + -té -ty2]
References in classic literature ?
Michel Ardan, always easy, dressed in thorough traveler's costume, leathern gaiters on his legs, pouch by his side, in loose velvet suit, cigar in mouth, was full of inexhaustible gayety, laughing, joking, playing pranks with J.
said he, in that tone of careless gayety which, in spite of so much grief and so many crosses, he had never lost.
The utmost animation and gayety prevailed throughout the camp.
The critical reader may possibly notice a tone of almost boisterous gayety in certain parts of these imaginary Confessions.
After those dismal night watches by the bed of her dying aunt, and the dreary weeks of solitude that followed, to live in this new world of luxury and gayety is like escaping from the darkness of night, and basking in the fall brightn ess of day.
Her activity of body, intellect, and heart impelled her continually to perform the ordinary little toils that offered themselves around her, and to think the thought proper for the moment, and to sympathize,--now with the twittering gayety of the robins in the pear-tree, and now to such a depth as she could with Hepzibah's dark anxiety, or the vague moan of her brother.
The whole group, except the principal figure, was made up of youth and gayety.
From this premeditated scheme of conquest we ought, in justice, however, to except Maria herself, who, from constitutional gayety and thoughtlessness, seldom planned for the morrow; and who, perhaps, from her association with Charlotte, had acquired a degree of disinterestedness that certainly belonged to no other member of her family.
She had more study hours, and less time, therefore, for the companionship of other girls, gladly as she would have welcomed the gayety of that side of school life.
Here and there were new brick houses and shops, just set up by bustling, driving, and eager men of traffic from the Atlantic States; while, on the other hand, the old French mansions, with open casements, still retained the easy, indolent air of the original colonists; and now and then the scraping of a fiddle, a strain of an ancient French song, or the sound of billiard balls, showed that the happy Gallic turn for gayety and amusement still lingered about the place.
The pale, wan face of the baroness recovered its usual tones, and even assumed a look of gayety.
Blanche's little outbreak of temper with her friend on the terrace, and Blanche's present deficiency of gayety and spirit, were attributable to the same cause.