gemma

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gem·ma

 (jĕm′ə)
n. pl. gem·mae (jĕm′ē′) Botany
An asexual budlike propagule capable of developing into a new individual, as in liverworts.

[Latin, bud; see gembh- in Indo-European roots.]

gemma

(ˈdʒɛmə)
n, pl -mae (-miː)
1. (Botany) a small asexual reproductive structure in liverworts, mosses, etc, that becomes detached from the parent and develops into a new individual
2. (Zoology) zoology another name for gemmule1
[C18: from Latin: bud, gem]
gemmaceous adj

gem•ma

(ˈdʒɛm ə)

n., pl. gem•mae (ˈdʒɛm i)
any budlike structure or outgrowth that can separate from the parent to form a new identical individual.
[1760–70; < Latin: bud, gem]

gem·ma

(jĕm′ə)
A bud-like outgrowth on certain organisms, such as the liverworts and mosses, that separates from the parent organism and develops into a new individual.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gemma - small asexual reproductive structure in e.g. liverworts and mosses that detaches from the parent and develops into a new individualgemma - small asexual reproductive structure in e.g. liverworts and mosses that detaches from the parent and develops into a new individual
reproductive structure - the parts of a plant involved in its reproduction
References in periodicals archive ?
Cryopreservation of gemmae of Marchantia polymorpha L.
Pollen wall ornamentation is large clavae, clavae often distally swollen, basally sometimes constricted, sometimes with gemmae or short clava-like projections, interspersed in a matrix of finer and smaller clavae (Table 2, Fig.
Observations on phyllotaxis, stelar morphology and gemmae of Lycopodium lucidulum (Lycopodiaceae).
Ricezione di iconografie della glittica ellenisticoromana in cammei vitrei altomedievali", Sertum Perusinum gemmae oblatum: docenti e allievi del Dottorato di Perugia in onore di Gemma Sena Chiesa (Quaderni di ostraka, vol.
In the springboard or catapult mechanism, the fruit or persistent calyx tube (or gemmae in the case of Kalanchoe tubiflora; Brodie 1955) is attached to the stem by a resilient pedicel, which is bent downward by falling raindrops and, as it recoils upward, seeds are dispersed.