gene


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Related to gene: gene expression, gene therapy, DNA

gene

 (jēn)
n.
A hereditary unit consisting of a sequence of DNA that occupies a specific location on a chromosome and is transcribed into an RNA molecule that may function directly or be translated into an amino acid chain. Genes undergo mutation when their DNA sequences change.

[German Gen, from gen-, begetting, in Greek words (such as genos, race, offspring); see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

gene

(dʒiːn)
n
(Genetics) a unit of heredity composed of DNA occupying a fixed position on a chromosome (some viral genes are composed of RNA). A gene may determine a characteristic of an individual by specifying a polypeptide chain that forms a protein or part of a protein (structural gene); or encode an RNA molecule; or regulate the operation of other genes or repress such operation. See also operon
[C20: from German Gen, shortened from Pangen; see pan-, -gen]

gene

(dʒin)

n.
the basic physical unit of heredity; a linear sequence of nucleotides along a segment of DNA that provides the coded instructions for synthesis of RNA, which, when translated into protein, leads to the expression of hereditary character.
[1911; < German Gen (1909), appar. independent use of -gen -gen; introduced by Danish geneticist Wilhelm Latin. Johannsen (1857–1927)]

gene

(jēn)
A segment of DNA, occupying a specific place on a chromosome, that is the basic unit of heredity. Genes act by directing the synthesis of proteins, which are the main components of cells and are the catalysts of all cellular processes. Physical traits, such as the shape of a plant leaf, the coloration of an animal's coat, and the texture of a person's hair, are all determined by genes. See also dominant, recessive. See Notes at DNA, Mendel.
Did You Know? What makes a human different from a chimpanzee? Much of the answer lies in the genes, the basic units of heredity. Each gene is a specific segment of DNA, occupying a fixed place on a chromosome. Genes contain the chemical information needed to create different kinds of proteins. These proteins are used to repair cells and make new ones. The kinds of proteins, the amounts, and the order in which they are made all help determine how one type of cell differs from another and, ultimately, how one species of organism differs from another. Just how different are the genes making up different life forms? In the case of the human and the chimp, not much: about 98 percent of the DNA in a chimpanzee cell is identical to the DNA in a human cell. Because of this close similarity, scientists think that it is the sequence of genes, as well as the types of genes themselves, that account for most of the differences between the two species. However, not all differences between species can be explained by gene differences alone. How closely matching sets of genes can belong to entirely different species is one of the great mysteries of modern biology.

gene

A piece of DNA molecule that determines a hereditary characteristic.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.gene - (genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chaingene - (genetics) a segment of DNA that is involved in producing a polypeptide chain; it can include regions preceding and following the coding DNA as well as introns between the exons; it is considered a unit of heredity; "genes were formerly called factors"
dominant gene - gene that produces the same phenotype in the organism whether or not its allele identical; "the dominant gene for brown eyes"
allele, allelomorph - (genetics) either of a pair (or series) of alternative forms of a gene that can occupy the same locus on a particular chromosome and that control the same character; "some alleles are dominant over others"
genetic marker - a specific gene that produces a recognizable trait and can be used in family or population studies
homeotic gene - one the genes that are involved in embryologic development
lethal gene - any gene that has an effect that causes the death of the organism at any stage of life
linkage group, linked genes - any pair of genes that tend to be transmitted together; "the genes of Drosophila fall into four linkage groups"
modifier gene, modifier - a gene that modifies the effect produced by another gene
mutant gene - a gene that has changed so that the normal transmission and expression of a trait is affected
nonallele - genes that are not competitors at the same locus
operator gene - a gene that activates the production of messenger RNA by adjacent structural genes
oncogene, transforming gene - a gene that disposes normal cells to change into cancerous tumor cells
polygene - a gene that by itself has little effect on the phenotype but which can act together with others to produce observable variations
proto-oncogene - a normal gene that has the potential to become an oncogene
recessive gene - gene that produces its characteristic phenotype only when its allele is identical; "the recessive gene for blue eyes"
regulator gene, regulatory gene - a gene that produces a repressor substance that inhibits an operator gene
repressor gene - gene that prevents a nonallele from being transcribed
structural gene - a gene that controls the production of a specific protein or peptide
suppresser gene, suppressor gene, suppresser, suppressor - a gene that suppresses the phenotypic expression of another gene (especially of a mutant gene)
transgene - an exogenous gene introduced into the genome of another organism
X-linked gene - a gene located on an X chromosome
holandric gene, Y-linked gene - a gene located on a Y chromosome
chromosome - a threadlike strand of DNA in the cell nucleus that carries the genes in a linear order; "humans have 22 chromosome pairs plus two sex chromosomes"
genetic science, genetics - the branch of biology that studies heredity and variation in organisms
molecular biology - the branch of biology that studies the structure and activity of macromolecules essential to life (and especially with their genetic role)
sequence - serial arrangement in which things follow in logical order or a recurrent pattern; "the sequence of names was alphabetical"; "he invented a technique to determine the sequence of base pairs in DNA"
deoxyribonucleic acid, desoxyribonucleic acid, DNA - (biochemistry) a long linear polymer found in the nucleus of a cell and formed from nucleotides and shaped like a double helix; associated with the transmission of genetic information; "DNA is the king of molecules"
Translations
مورَثَهمُوَرِّثَة
gen
gen
geeni
gen
gén
gen, erfîavísir
遺伝子
유전자
genasgenetikagenetinisgenų inžinerija
gēns
genă
gén
gen
สายพันธุ์
gien

gene

[dʒiːn]
A. N (Bio) → gene m, gen m
B. CPD gene mapping Ncartografía f genética
gene splicing Nacoplamiento m de genes
gene therapy Nterapia f génica, terapia f de genes

gene

[ˈdʒiːn] ngène m gene pool, gene sequence, gene technology, gene therapy

gene

nGen nt, → Erbfaktor m

gene

:
gene bank
nGenbank f
gene pool
nErbmasse f

gene

[dʒiːn] n (Bio) → gene m

gene

(dʒiːn) noun
any of the basic elements of heredity, passed from parents to their offspring. If the children are red-haired, one of their parents must have a gene for red hair.
genetic (dʒəˈnetik) adjective
of genes or genetics. a genetic abnormality.
genetic engineering noun
the science of changing the genetic features of animals and plants.
genetics (dʒəˈnetiks) noun singular
the science of heredity.

gene

مُوَرِّثَة gen gen Gen γονίδιο gen geeni gène gen gene 遺伝子 유전자 gen gen gen gene ген gen สายพันธุ์ gen gien 基因

gene

n. gen, unidad básica de rasgos hereditarios;
dominant ______ dominante;
___ frequencyfrecuencia del ___;
lethal ______ letal;
recessive ______ recesivo;
sex-linked ______ ligado al sexo.

gene

n gen m
References in classic literature ?
It was worth while undergoing the gene of it to know that one was perfectly fit.
Take the post-chaise which you will find waiting at the Porte de Genes, as you enter Nice; pass through Turin, Chambery, and Pont-de-Beauvoisin.
In these works, the gene is described in moral terms and seems to dictate the actions of criminals, celebrities, political leaders, and literary and scientific figures.
Based on the gene frequencies found on chromosomes 21 and 22, some researchers now believe that the total number of genes that it takes to make a human being might be as few as 40,000, rather than the 70,000 to 140,000 predicted earlier.
The variability between these genes reveals the importance of detailed candidate gene studies.
Another, engineering animals to lack a specific gene, can take at least a year.
Upon further analysis of sequences within the Angrem52 cDNA downstream of the putative matrix gene, several relatively short OREs were found to encode peptides with homology to paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins.
Gene Express offers the most advanced gene expression technology available based on patented technology invented by Gene Express Chief Scientific and Medical Consultant Dr.
Typically, each gene contains the "recipe" for one protein.
Meanwhile, an attempt at something close to what is now called gene therapy had been made in 1970 by Dr.
While variation in genes is normal, sometimes a difference in the code of a gene can be responsible for a disease that can be inherited.
New data integration tools allow scientists to import multiple gene expression data types, and new data analysis and annotation tools facilitate rapid and thorough compound safety assessment using toxicogenomics.