genealogical tree

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Related to genealogical trees: Genealogy tree

genealogical tree

n
(Genetics) another name for family tree
Translations

genealogical tree

nStammbaum m
References in classic literature ?
For the last hundred years the daughters of the family had married nobles belonging to the provinces; consequently, this family had thrown out so many suckers throughout the duchy as to appear on nearly all the genealogical trees.
Prince Andrew was looking at a large gilt frame, new to him, containing the genealogical tree of the Princes Bolkonski, opposite which hung another such frame with a badly painted portrait (evidently by the hand of the artist belonging to the estate) of a ruling prince, in a crown- an alleged descendant of Rurik and ancestor of the Bolkonskis.
Nephew--to--Lord--Decimus,' Mr Meagles luxuriously repeated with his eyes shut, that he might have nothing to distract him from the full flavour of the genealogical tree.
All these he bequeathed to me, with a thousand Roman crowns, which he had in ready money, on condition that I would have anniversary masses said for the repose of his soul, and that I would draw up a genealogical tree and history of his house.
Right from the introductory pages, the book's elegantly fluid style engages us in a compelling narrative about museums, complex genealogical trees, Amerindian inheritance, and self-knowledge.
In 2005, I embarked on a full-blown research project, scouring business, sports, fashion, and the arts to find potential superbosses and map out their genealogical trees.
We combined the remaining samples of 4,000 genealogical trees and performed trunk reconstruction on them.
Genealogical trees, full index, several pages of photographic plates and many b&w illustrations included.
Acheson observes that these tables were used in fields as diverse as theology, philosophy, history, and medicine, with taxonomic diagrams and genealogical trees being a few examples.
The book is divided into an introduction, nine chapters, an epilogue, a conclusion, appendices (designating the known merchants involved in Yemeni trade, genealogical trees of merchants and administrators, and administrators in Aden), maps from the Rasulid texts, a forty-five-page bibliography, and indices of placenames, individuals, peoples, and a thematic breakdown of the contents.
Nevertheless he deserves credit for the range of his reading and the care with which he develops his arguments, along with such scholarly innovations as a table of contents, genealogical trees, and marginal lists of the sources he consulted.

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