generative grammar


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Related to generative grammar: universal grammar

generative grammar

n.
1. A linguistic theory that attempts to describe a native speaker's tacit grammatical knowledge by a system of rules that specify all of the well-formed, or grammatical, sentences of a language while excluding all ungrammatical, or impossible, sentences.
2. A grammar constructed according to this theory.

generative grammar

n
(Linguistics) a description of a language in terms of explicit rules that ideally generate all and only the grammatical sentences of the language. Compare transformational grammar

gen′erative gram′mar


n.
1. a linguistic theory that attempts to describe the tacit knowledge a native speaker has of a language by establishing a set of formal rules that generate all the possible grammatical sentences of a language, while excluding all unacceptable sentences. Compare transformational grammar.
2. a set of such rules.
[1955–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.generative grammar - (linguistics) a type of grammar that describes syntax in terms of a set of logical rules that can generate all and only the infinite number of grammatical sentences in a language and assigns them all the correct structural description
linguistics - the scientific study of language
syntax - studies of the rules for forming admissible sentences
Translations
generative Grammatik

generative grammar

References in periodicals archive ?
On the one hand, he claims that generative grammar is a theory of abstract linguistic entities.
A rigorous selection of 10 papers from an April 2006 conference on generative grammar, held in Madrid, offers insights into persistent debates in theoretical linguistics.
If anyone managed to construct an adequate generative grammar for some human language, that would certainly be good evidence.
LFG is a branch of generative grammar (BRESNAN, 2001; FALK, 2001).
Chomsky uses the term "language" to refer to the generative grammar itself, but it is also, of course, often used to describe the output of the generative grammar.
The second option has only been pursued from "alternative" / "outsider" approaches, like Survive Minimalism (Stroik & Putnam, 2013) and Simpler Syntax (Culicover & Jackendoff, 2005) within (non-mainstream) Generative Grammar.
At MIT, Geoff met Noam Chomsky and the other leading generative linguists of that period but, having attended many of their courses, decided that generative grammar was a bit to constraining for him, even though his time at MIT had developed his analytical and argumentative powers considerably.
This distinction has been articulated in the tradition of generative grammar as the distinction between I(nternal)-language and E(xternalized)-language (Chomsky 1986).
A perspective of a different nature in relation to the discursive norm opens up on the basis of generative grammar principles in the design of the language norm, as indicated by several contemporary researchers (Ducrot & Schaeffer 1995).
After presenting early developments in generative grammar, the function of transformations, and the properties of concatenation, Collins suggests that the required combinatorial principle might be identified with the basic set theoretic operation called Merge.
One goal of Noam Chomsky's generative grammar has been to explain how speakers can understand indefinitely many new utterances, despite receiving only finite information from their surroundings.
For instance, Chomsky in formulating his generative grammar posits that knowing a language involves knowing grammar--"a domain-specific form of knowledge representation that allows the language user to create a nearly infinite set of well-formed utterances and that grammar is a characterization of the knowledge of an idealized speaker-hearer" (Chomsky, as cited in Seidenberg & MacDonald, 1999, p.