generative grammar


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Related to generative grammar: universal grammar

generative grammar

n.
1. A linguistic theory that attempts to describe a native speaker's tacit grammatical knowledge by a system of rules that specify all of the well-formed, or grammatical, sentences of a language while excluding all ungrammatical, or impossible, sentences.
2. A grammar constructed according to this theory.

generative grammar

n
(Linguistics) a description of a language in terms of explicit rules that ideally generate all and only the grammatical sentences of the language. Compare transformational grammar

gen′erative gram′mar


n.
1. a linguistic theory that attempts to describe the tacit knowledge a native speaker has of a language by establishing a set of formal rules that generate all the possible grammatical sentences of a language, while excluding all unacceptable sentences. Compare transformational grammar.
2. a set of such rules.
[1955–60]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.generative grammar - (linguistics) a type of grammar that describes syntax in terms of a set of logical rules that can generate all and only the infinite number of grammatical sentences in a language and assigns them all the correct structural description
linguistics - the scientific study of language
syntax - studies of the rules for forming admissible sentences
Translations
generative Grammatik

generative grammar

References in periodicals archive ?
After presenting early developments in generative grammar, the function of transformations, and the properties of concatenation, Collins suggests that the required combinatorial principle might be identified with the basic set theoretic operation called Merge.
One goal of Noam Chomsky's generative grammar has been to explain how speakers can understand indefinitely many new utterances, despite receiving only finite information from their surroundings.
The major caveat arises in keeping with the tradition of generative grammar.
In reply to the second query, the author reviews the copious and sometimes scattered published research on Italian phonology from Pietro Bembo's (1470-1547) Prose della volgar lingua (1525) to Mario Saltarelli's groundbreaking theoretical work (A Phonology of Italian in a Generative Grammar, 1970, The Hague: Mouton) as well as the most recent scholarship on Italian phonology through 2007.
In the Minimalist model, the lexicon (the mental dictionary of lexical items or words with their linguistic properties) has taken on a greater role in the grammar than it had in earlier generative grammar theory.
Dahl, Osten 1974 "Topic-comment structure in a generative grammar with a semantic base", in: Frantisek Danes (ed.
As a graduate of the 1974 class of Estonian philology at the University of Tartu she belongs to the generation of the generative grammar group (GGG).
Those developments were to result in the establishment of generative grammar as the received linguistic theory and the rejection of the behaviourist-inspired structural linguistics and, to cut a long story very short, in the acceptance of foreign and second language learning Not as the acquiring of a new set of habits but as a creative construction process (Kennedy & Holmes 1976; Krashen 1981) akin to the acquisition of the L1.
The task of describing the theology of a religion - in the present case, of a privileged collection of religious writings, deemed continuous with one another and held to form a cogent statement - is to discover the generative grammar that dictates the flow of thought and imposes form upon it.
Even though there was levity in the topic--both in the examples and in the name of the rule (1)--the paper had a serious theoretical purpose: to demonstrate the need for rules that produced syntactic changes between underlying and surface structure that went well beyond what was permissible in more orthodox forms of transformational generative grammar.
There is a nod to generative grammar in the headings of [section]A: Noun Phrase Expanded and [section]B: Verb Phrase Expanded, but the topics covered in these sections are treated in fairly traditional manner; the arrangement and presentation of these is clear, insightful, and detailed, and can be consulted with profit by Semitists of all stripes.
Lutz Edzard (University of Oslo) treats the relatively new Optimality theory, with connections to generative grammar, in connection to Arabic phonology--a laudable example of building bridges to other disciplines and enriching Arabic linguistics.