generative

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gen·er·a·tive

 (jĕn′ər-ə-tĭv, -ə-rā′-)
adj.
1. Having the ability to originate, produce, or procreate.
2. Of or relating to the production of offspring.
3. Relating to or produced by the rules of a generative grammar.

generative

(ˈdʒɛnərətɪv)
adj
1. (Biology) of or relating to the production of offspring, parts, etc: a generative cell.
2. capable of producing or originating

gen•er•a•tive

(ˈdʒɛn ər ə tɪv, -əˌreɪ tɪv)

adj.
1. capable of producing or creating.
2. pertaining to the production of offspring.
3.
a. of or pertaining to generative grammar.
b. using rules to generate surface linguistic forms from underlying, abstract forms.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Middle French < Late Latin]
gen′er•a•tive•ly, adv.
gen′er•a•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.generative - having the ability to produce or originate; "generative power"; "generative forces"
consumptive - tending to consume or use often wastefully; "water suitable for beneficial consumptive uses"; "duties consumptive of time and energy"; "consumptive fires"
2.generative - producing new life or offspring; "the reproductive potential of a species is its relative capacity to reproduce itself under optimal conditions"; "the reproductive or generative organs"
fruitful - productive or conducive to producing in abundance; "be fruitful and multiply"
Translations

generative

[ˈdʒenərətɪv]
A. ADJgenerativo
B. CPD generative grammar Ngramática f generativa

generative

[ˈdʒɛnərətɪv] adj
(gen)générateur/trice
(LINGUISTICS)génératif/ive

generative

adj (Biol) → Zeugungs-, generativ (spec); (Elec) → Erzeugungs-; generative organs (Biol) → Zeugungsorgane pl

generative

[ˈdʒɛnərətɪv] adj (Ling) → generativo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense, there will be moments when something more than paternity, and parenting will have to be addressed, as a set of functions geared towards developing autonomy and a sense of security for children, which guarantees generativeness (17).
These challenges can be summarized in three fundamental ones: the meaning of sexual difference, the lastingness of the promise of love, and the generativeness and the fecundity of conjugal love.
I have elsewhere examined the ways in which contemporary women poets employ traditional images for the female bodyflower, water, earth-retaining the gender identification of these images but transforming their attributes so that flower means force instead of frailty, water means safety instead of death, and earth means creative imagination instead of passive generativeness.

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