genet


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Related to genet: Citizen Genet

Ge·nêt

 (zhə-nā′)
See Janet Flanner.

gen·et 1

 (jĕn′ĭt, jə-nĕt′)
n.
Any of several carnivorous mammals of the genus Genetta of Africa, Europe, and the Middle East, having grayish or yellowish fur with dark spots and a long ringed tail.

[Middle English, from Old French genete, of Iberian Romance origin; akin to Spanish jineta, perhaps originally a feminine form (used in the sense "bandit" to refer to the genet euphemistically because it preys on poultry) of Spanish jinete, horseman, from Old Spanish ginete; see jennet.]

gen·et 2

 (jĕn′ĭt)
n.
A group of genetically identical individuals descended from one progenitor, as a group of trees that have all sprouted from the roots of a single parent; a clone.

[From genetic (on the model of ramet).]

gen·et 3

 (jĕn′ĭt)
n.
See jennet.

genet

(ˈdʒɛnɪt) or

genette

n
1. (Animals) any agile catlike viverrine mammal of the genus Genetta, inhabiting wooded regions of Africa and S Europe, having an elongated head, thick spotted or blotched fur, and a very long tail
2. (Animals) the fur of such an animal
[C15: from Old French genette, from Arabic jarnayt]

genet

(ˈdʒɛnɪt)
n
(Animals) an obsolete spelling of jennet

Genet

(French ʒənɛ)
n
(Biography) Jean (ʒɑ̃). 1910–86, French dramatist and novelist; his novels include Notre-Dame des Fleurs (1944) and his plays Les Bonnes (1947) and Le Balcon (1956)

Ge•net

(ʒəˈneɪ)

n.
Jean (ʒɑ̃) 1910–86, French playwright and novelist.

gen•et1

(ˈdʒɛn ɪt, dʒəˈnɛt)

also ge•nette′,



n.
1. any African or European viverrid carnivore of the genus Genetta, having spotted sides and a ringed tail.
2. the fur of such an animal.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Old French genette < Arabic jarnait]

gen•et2

(ˈdʒɛn ɪt)

n.

Ge•nêt

(ʒəˈneɪ)

n.
Edmond Charles Edouard ( “Citizen Genêt” ), 1763–1834, French minister to the U.S. in 1793.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Genêt - French diplomat who in 1793 tried to draw the United States into the war between France and England (1763-1834)Genet - French diplomat who in 1793 tried to draw the United States into the war between France and England (1763-1834)
2.Genet - French writer of novels and dramas for the theater of the absurd (1910-1986)
3.Genêt - agile Old World viverrine having a spotted coat and long ringed tailgenet - agile Old World viverrine having a spotted coat and long ringed tail
viverrine, viverrine mammal - small cat-like predatory mammals of warmer parts of the Old World
Translations

genet

[ˈdʒenɪt] Njineta f, gineta f
References in classic literature ?
She had forced us to accept a little souvenir, a magnificent Spanish GENET and an Andalusian mule, which were beautiful to look upon.
Silicon Genetics' President and CEO, Saeid Akhtari, credits the strength of the company's flagship products, GeneSpring and GeNet, in the genomics research community, and the company's outstanding employee-base with the company's revenue growth over the past five years.
Reduction of urinary tract and cardiovascular defects by periconceptional multivitamin supplementation, Am J Med Genet 62:176-183.
The selection looks faultless, with an all-out focus on the early Surrealist-influenced sculpture; the inclusion of later masterworks such as the spectral painting of Jean Genet (1954-55); and not too much bronze anorexia.
John Rechy and Jean Genet were my favorite authors.
Genetic epidemiology of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United States of America Clin Genet.
Viewers witnessed two maids stealing into the very room in which the work was being shown and, in a curious sequence reminiscent of Genet, taking the place of the regular guests and consuming the meal meant for them.
Genet anticipates that 175 associates will be employed at the new Miami facility and the architects, designers, and engineering firms that helped complete the 12-acre project under COO, Frank Sansone's, direction are also Miami based.
DETECTIVES have been granted extra time to question a suspect following the death of Coventry woman Genet Kidane.
Among Tomaselli's choices were Wisdom and Compassion: The Sacred Art of Tibet and (Guide to) Hallucinogenic Plants as well as volumes by Nabokov, Pynchon, and Burroughs; these selections jibed with Moody's editions of Genet, Beckett, Low-Level Radioactive Waste: A Citizen's Guide, and The Complete Paintings of Hieronymus Bosch.
It includes tools for expression data quality control, statistical analysis, and queries across the GeNet repository.